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ARS Home » Plains Area » Lincoln, Nebraska » Agroecosystem Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #319162

Research Project: ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND MANURE MANAGEMENT FOR REDUCTION OF GAS EMISSIONS, NUTRIENTS, AND PATHOGENS

Location: Agroecosystem Management Research

Title: Lime application to manure as a management strategy for Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus

Author
item Brittenham, Bethany - University Of Nebraska
item Millmier-schmidt, Amy - University Of Nebraska
item Miller, Daniel
item Mcghee, Ryan

Submitted to: ASABE Annual International Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/30/2015
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Arrival of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus (PEDv) in 2013 resulted in billions of dollars in losses in the United States. Currently, increased on-farm biosecurity and mortality management help limit the virus spread. Managing PEDv infections requires mandatory reporting to the United States Department of Agriculture upon confirmation and implementing drastic remediation steps to rehabilitate production areas. Because PEDv is directly spread through contact with infected manure and fatal to most piglets younger than two weeks old, proper management practices to treat and apply contaminated manure are critical to contain infection and limit reinfection at ‘cleared’ production sites. The goal of this project was to assess the efficacy of quick lime application, which raises slurry pH, to PEDv-contaminated manure as a method of disinfection. Application time was varied (1 to 24 hours) and the effect on PEDv was determined. Ammonia losses (via volatilization) increased with time. PEDv was monitored by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of a PEDv-specific gene to assess viral activity.

Technical Abstract: Arrival of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus (PEDv) in 2013 resulted in billions of dollars in losses in the United States. Currently, increased on-farm biosecurity and mortality management help limit the virus spread. Managing PEDv infections requires mandatory reporting to the United States Department of Agriculture upon confirmation and implementing drastic remediation steps to rehabilitate production areas. Because PEDv is directly spread through contact with infected manure and fatal to most piglets younger than two weeks old, proper management practices to treat and apply contaminated manure are critical to contain infection and limit reinfection at ‘cleared’ production sites. The goal of this project was to assess the efficacy of quick lime application, which raises slurry pH, to PEDv-contaminated manure as a method of disinfection. Application time was varied (1 to 24 hours) and the effect on PEDv was determined. Ammonia losses (via volatilization) increased with time. PEDv was monitored by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of a PEDv-specific gene to assess viral activity.