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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #317995

Research Project: Improved Strategies for Management of Soilborne Diseases of Horticultural Crops

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: First description of necrosis in leaves and pseudo-bulbs of Oncidium orchids caused by Burkholderia gladioli in São Paulo State, Brazil

Author
item Mano, E - Universidad De Sao Paulo
item Minami, S - Universidad De Sao Paulo
item Loper, Joyce
item Araujo, W - Universidade Federal De Viçosa

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/31/2015
Publication Date: 6/9/2015
Citation: Mano, E.T., Minami, S.N., Loper, J.E., Araujo, W.L. 2015. First description of necrosis in leaves and pseudo-bulbs of Oncidium orchids caused by Burkholderia gladioli in São Paulo State, Brazil. Plant Disease. doi: 10.1094/PDIS-03-15-0297-PDN.

Interpretive Summary: A necrosis of orchid leaves and pseudobulbs was observed in a commercial orchid nursery in Mogi das Cruzes, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The symptoms were water-soaked, brown lesions that can develop into large areas of necrosis that extend throughout the entire plant, ultimately causing death. Bacteria were isolated from symptomatic plants, purified, and nine isolates were used to fulfill Koch's postulates. The bacteria were identified as Burkholderia gladioli based on 16S rRNA gene sequence and a range of physiological tests. The flower market in Brazil is estimated at US $2.5 billion in 2012. Considering the importance of orchids in the annual sales, future studies should be focused on disease incidence, pathogen distribution and the management of the orchid necrosis caused by B. gladioli in commercial nurseries.

Technical Abstract: A necrosis of orchid leaves and pseudobulbs was observed in a commercial orchid nursery in Mogi das Cruzes, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The symptoms were water-soaked, brown lesions that can develop into large areas of necrosis that extend throughout the entire plant, ultimately causing death. Bacteria were isolated from symptomatic plants, purified, and nine isolates were used to fulfill Koch's postulates. The bacteria were identified as Burkholderia gladioli based on 16S rRNA gene sequence and a range of physiological tests.