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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Systematic Entomology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #305970

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF HEMIPTERA AND RELATED GROUPS: PLANT PESTS, PREDATORS, AND DISEASE VECTORS

Location: Systematic Entomology Laboratory

Title: A new species of Atheroides Haliday (Hemiptera, Aphididae) native to North America

Author
item Miller, Gary
item Jensen, A. - Washington State University
item Metz, Mark
item Parmenter, R. - Valles Caldera National Preserve

Submitted to: ZooKeys
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/2/2014
Publication Date: 11/4/2014
Publication URL: http://zookeys.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=4218
Citation: Miller, G.L., Jensen, A.S., Metz, M., Parmenter, R.R. 2014. A new species of Atheroides Haliday (Hemiptera, Aphididae) native to North America. ZooKeys. 452:35-50.

Interpretive Summary: Aphids are pests that feed on many of the world’s agriculturally important crops, trees, and ornamental plants. In addition to direct feeding damage, aphids are one of the most important insects in the role of transmission of plant diseases. This research describes a previously undescribed species of aphid from the Valles Caldera National Preserve in New Mexico. Discovery of this aphid enhances the scientific knowledge of biodiversity within this unique area. Illustrations, descriptions, and identification keys are provided. Identification of this aphid will be of interest to range land managers, biodiversity researchers, and quarantine personnel at ports-of-entry in the U.S.

Technical Abstract: Report and description of the first species of Atheroides Haliday presumed to be native to North America was collected at the Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM, USA. Hypothesis on its placement among the Siphini is based on morphological and phylogenetic analysis. These findings expand the distribution of the genus to the Holoarctic region. A key of the known Atheroides includes the new species and a discussion on the current hypotheses of the geographic distribution of the type species, Atheroides serrulatus Haliday, is presented.