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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Frederick, Maryland » Foreign Disease-weed Science Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #302166

Research Project: Identification, Characterization, and Biology of Foreign and Emerging Viral and Bacterial Plant Pathogens

Location: Foreign Disease-weed Science Research

Title: First report of citrus leprosis virus nuclear type in Colombia

Author
item Roy, Avijit
item Leon, M. Guillermo
item Stone, Andrew - Andy
item Schneider, William
item Hartung, John
item Brlansky, Ronald

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/19/2014
Publication Date: 8/1/2014
Citation: Roy, A., Leon, M., Stone, A.L., Schneider, W.L., Hartung, J.S., Brlansky, R. 2014. First report of citrus leprosis virus nuclear type in Colombia. Plant Disease. 98:1162.

Interpretive Summary: Plants are subject to a large number of diseases, and many of these are caused by viruses. Citrus crops are no exception, and one of the emerging threats to citrus production is a disease called Citrus leprosis. This disease causes lesions to form on citrus stems, leaves and fruit, resulting in significant production losses. Citrus leprosis has not been found in the United States, but evidence suggests that this disease is spreading. Citrus leprosis is caused by three different viruses: Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic types (CiLV-C and CiLV-C2) and Citrus leprosis virus nuclear type (CiLV-N). CiLV-C and CiLV-C2 viruses have been identified in many central and South American countries, but CiLV-N had only been found in Brazil and Mexico. In 2013 leprosis affected oranges were found with unusual lesions. A series of tests indicated that these trees were infected with two leprosis causing viruses, CiLV-N and CiLV-C2. This is the first report of CiLV-N in Colombia, as well as the first report of a mixed infection of two different CiLV viruses anywhere in the world.

Technical Abstract: Citrus leprosis is a difficult viral disease causing significant damage to citrus fruit in South America and Central America. The disease is marked by dramatic lesions on fruit, leaves and stems resulting in unmarketable product. Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic types (CiLV-C and CiLV-C2) wer edetected in states of Columbia between 2004 and present. In 2013, CiLV affected oranges with different symptoms were observed in Columbia. Leprosis samples from these trees failed to react with CiLV-C specific RT-PCR assays. However, in RT-PCR CiLV-C2 and Citrus leprosis virus nuclear type (CiLV-N) specific primers both produced amplicons. The presence of both of these viruses was further confirmed by sequencing the amplicons. This is the first report of CiLV-N in Colombia, as well as the first report of a mixed infection of CiLV-N and CiLV-C2. These pathogens represent a significant threat to an important Colombian crop.