Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Systematic Entomology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #297867

Research Project: Systematics of Parasitic and Herbivorous Wasps of Agricultural Importance

Location: Systematic Entomology Laboratory

Title: Discovery of Paratelenomus saccharalis (Dodd) (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae), an Egg Parasitoid of the Bean Plataspid, Megacopta cribraria F. (Hemiptera: Plataspidae), in its Expanded North American Range

Author
item Gardner, Wayne - University Of Georgia
item Blount, Joni - Auburn University
item Golec, Julian - Auburn University
item Couret, Janelle - Emory University
item Jones, Walker - Delta Farmers Advocating Resource Management (FARM)
item Hu, Xing Ping - Auburn University
item Dong, Xiangli - Auburn University
item Talamas, Elijah
item Ray, Jr, Charles - Auburn University
item Buntin, G. - Emory University
item Gerardo, Nicole - Emory University

Submitted to: Journal of Insect Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/27/2013
Publication Date: 10/1/2013
Citation: Gardner, W.A., Blount, J.L., Golec, J.R., Couret, J.R., Jones, W.A., Hu, X., Dong, X., Talamas, E.J., Ray, Jr, C.H., Buntin, G.D., Gerardo, N.M. 2013. Discovery of Paratelenomus saccharalis (Dodd) (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae), an Egg Parasitoid of the Bean Plataspid, Megacopta cribraria F. (Hemiptera: Plataspidae), in its Expanded North American Range. Journal of Insect Science. 48(4):355-359.

Interpretive Summary: The kudzu bug is an Asian species of insect that feeds on kudzu and soybean, and it is now an invasive pest in the United States. A tiny parasitic wasp that develops in, and kills, the eggs of the kudzu bug was under study in quarantine facilities in Mississippi to assess its potential as a biological control agent. This same species of parasitic wasp was recently discovered “in the wild” and how it came to independently establish itself in the United States remains unknown. Extension entomologists, biological control researchers, and ecologists will use the data in this note for their own research into the kudzu bug.

Technical Abstract: n/a