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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Ecological Interactions in Integrated and Biologically-Based Management of Invasive Plant Species in Western Rangelands

Location: Great Basin Rangelands Research

Title: Classical biological control of invasive teasels (Dipsacus spp.) and other weeds in areas of limited or restricted weed management)

Author
item Rector, Brian
item Stoeva, Atanaska
item Harizanova, Vili
item Petanovic, Radmila

Submitted to: Integrated Pest Management
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/5/2012
Publication Date: 3/29/2012
Citation: Rector, B.G., Stoeva, A., Harizanova, V., Petanovic, R. 2012. Classical biological control of invasive teasels (Dipsacus spp.) and other weeds in areas of limited or restricted weed management [abstract]. Integrated Pest Management. 39.4.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Invasive teasels (Dipsacus spp.) are considered noxious in five states and listed as invasive in more than a dozen others, despite having little effect on agriculture. They are problematic in areas of limited weed management such as along highways and railroads and in ditches, wetlands and parks. A classical biological control program established by USDA-ARS has identified several candidate agents for teasel control including a sawfly, an eriophyid mite, a flea beetle, and a leaf-mining fly. The mite and sawfly show promise; however development of this research program has stalled due to inconsistent stakeholder support.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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