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ARS Home » Plains Area » College Station, Texas » Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center » Crop Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #263672

Title: Effect of systemic fungicides in the control of sorghum grain parasitic mycoflora

Author
item MONTES-GARCIA, NOE - INSTITUTO NACIONAL DE INVESTIGACIONES FORESTALES Y AGROPECUARIAS (INIFAP)
item Prom, Louis
item MONTES-RODRIGUEZ, NOE - UNIVERSITY OF TAMAULIPAS
item GARCIA-GARCIA, MIGUEL ANGEL - INSTITUTO NACIONAL DE INVESTIGACIONES FORESTALES Y AGROPECUARIAS (INIFAP)
item PECINA-QUINTERO, VICTOR - INSTITUTO NACIONAL DE INVESTIGACIONES FORESTALES Y AGROPECUARIAS (INIFAP)
item DIAZ-FRANCO, ARTURO - INSTITUTO NACIONAL DE INVESTIGACIONES FORESTALES Y AGROPECUARIAS (INIFAP)

Submitted to: Mexican Journal of Phytopathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/1/2010
Publication Date: 12/1/2010
Citation: Montes-Garcia, N., Prom, L.K., Montes-Rodriguez, N., Garcia-Garcia, M., Pecina-Quintero, V., Diaz-Franco, A. 2010. Effect of systemic fungicides in the control of sorghum grain parasitic mycoflora. Mexican Journal of Phytopathology. 28(2):156-158.

Interpretive Summary: Grain mold in sorghum is caused by a number of fungal species. As a result, controlling this disease complex is very difficult, especially in areas with frequent rains late in the growing season. Seeds infected with grain mold have lower yield and quality. In this study, four fungicides Tilt, Folicur, Benlate, and Bayleton were applied on several sorghum lines at different developmental stages (flowering, milk stage and at physiological maturity). Application of these fungicides at flowering resulted in more healthy seeds when compared with non-treated plants. The results also show that application of these fungicides at 125 ppm will provide protection against the grain molding fungi. This will in turn increase the productivity and profitability of sorghum.

Technical Abstract: Triazolic fungicides were applied to sorghum genotypes at several rates during the grain filling (flowering, milk stage and at physiological maturity) period to determine their effectiveness in controlling grain mold. After harvest, seeds were plated on potato dextrose agar. Application of these fungicides at flowering resulted in higher number of healthy seeds when compared with the control or non-treated plants. When the fungicides were applied at rates of 62.5 and 125 ppm, there was 19.5 to 21.5% increase in healthy seeds over the control plants.