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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: On-Plant Volatile Analysis Utilizing Solid-Phase Microextraction and a New Volatile Collection Technique)

Author
item Beck, John
item Merrill, Glory
item Higbee, Bradley

Submitted to: American Society of Pharmacognosy
Publication Type: Abstract only
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/16/2007
Publication Date: 7/14/2007
Citation: Beck, J.J., Merrill, G.B., Higbee, B.S. 2007. On-Plant Volatile Analysis Utilizing Solid-Phase Microextraction and a New Volatile Collection Technique. American Society of Pharmacognosy. Meeting Abstract.

Interpretive Summary: Volatile emission of plants is typically measured by removal of the plant-part, transportation to a laboratory, and subsequent volatile analyses via a number of accepted methodologies. Studies performed by our laboratory have shown the volatile emission of removed plant parts are essentially identical to the volatiles produced if the plants parts were injured. Using a new method of on-plant volatile collection the volatile output of the readily available Pittosporum undulatum fruit was measured before and after injury while the fruit was still intact on the tree. In a corresponding experiment, the volatile emission of an intact fruit was evaluated then the fruit removed from its host and the volatile output of the fruit reevaluated. The results demonstrated the volatiles produced by the damaged fruit were essentially identical to the volatile emission of the removed fruit. In addition, results from two other studies utilizing this new technique will be presented.

Technical Abstract: Volatile emission of plants is typically measured by removal of the plant-part, transportation to a laboratory, and subsequent volatile analyses via a number of accepted methodologies. Studies performed by our laboratory have shown the volatile emission of removed plant parts are essentially identical to the volatiles produced if the plants parts were injured. Using a new method of on-plant volatile collection the volatile output of the readily available Pittosporum undulatum fruit was measured before and after injury while the fruit was still intact on the tree. In a corresponding experiment, the volatile emission of an intact fruit was evaluated then the fruit removed from its host and the volatile output of the fruit reevaluated. The results demonstrated the volatiles produced by the damaged fruit were essentially identical to the volatile emission of the removed fruit. In addition, results from two other studies utilizing this new technique will be presented.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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