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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Parlier, California » San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center » Commodity Protection and Quality Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #210726

Title: OLIVE FRUIT FLY MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES FOR 2006

Author
item JOHNSON, MARSHALL
item ZALOM, FRANK
item STEENWYK, ROBERT VANN
item VOSSEN, PAUL
item DEVARENNE, ALEXANDRA
item DAANE, KENT
item KRUEGAR, WILLIAM
item CONNELL, JOSEPH
item Yokoyama, Victoria
item BISABRI, BARAT
item CAPRILE, JANET
item NELSON, JANET

Submitted to: UC Plant Protection Quarterly
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/1/2006
Publication Date: 8/1/2006
Citation: Johnson, M.W., Zalom, F.G., Steenwyk, R., Vossen, P., Devarenne, A.K., Daane, K.M., Kruegar, W.H., Connell, J.H., Yokoyama, V.Y., Bisabri, B., Caprile, J., Nelson, J. 2006. Olive Fruit Fly Management Guidelines for 2006. UC Plant Protection Quarterly. 16:1-9.

Interpretive Summary: Olive fruit fly populations have increased dramatically in California over the last five years in both commercial and urban settings. Thus, a higher potential for olive fruit fly damage now exists if management treatments are withheld. To better understand and control the olive fruit fly, research is being conducted to reduce information gaps. These efforts are being funded by several sources including the University of California, USDA Agricultural Research Service, USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, California Department of Food and Agriculture, and the California Olive Committee.

Technical Abstract: Research topics include but are not limited to: a) maximization of the efficacy of GF-120 bait treatments used within olive groves; b) discovery, introduction, and establishment of parasitic wasps that attack OLF (i.e., classical biological control); c) development of phenology models for OLF and olive fruit development to improve treatment timing and potentially reduce number of sprays; d) effects of cultural practices on overwintering OLF populations; e) use of climatic data to estimate impacts of summer heat on the mortality of OLF eggs, larvae, and adults in various regions of California; g) establishment of damage threshold levels for oil production; h) identification of more attractive compounds produced by yeasts for use in traps and baits; i) comparison of olive varietal susceptibility; j) impact of water management on olive fly damage, and k) efficacy of mass trapping techniques to lower OLF damage in olives used for oil production.