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ARS Home » Plains Area » Houston, Texas » Children's Nutrition Research Center » Research » Research Project #436280

Research Project: Defining a Pathway of Oxalic Acid Catabolism, Influence on Nutritional Composition, Phytochemical, and Production in Dietary Important Plants

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Project Number: 3092-51000-061-01-S
Project Type: Non-Assistance Cooperative Agreement

Start Date: Apr 1, 2019
End Date: Sep 30, 2020

Objective:
Objective 1. Characterize oxalate catabolic activity in low and high oxalate plants of dietary importance such as leafy greens harvested at different stages of development. Subobjective 1A: Characterize dynamic changes in oxalic acid and calcium oxalate crystal formation and assess mineral bioavailability in low and high oxalate leafy plants at different developmental stages Subobjective 1B: Measure oxalate catabolic activity in low and high oxalate leafy plants at different developmental stages. Objective 2. Identify and characterize in a model plant system the genes and encoded proteins responsible for each step in a novel pathway of oxalate catabolism. Subobjective 2A: Isolate and biochemically characterize the putative enzymes responsible for catalyzing the remaining steps in the CoA-dependent pathway of oxalate catabolism Subobjective 2B: Assignment of each putative enzyme to the CoA-dependent pathway of oxalate catabolism. Objective 3. Determine the influence of the newly identified oxalate catabolism pathway on the nutritional composition, phytochemical profile, and production characteristics in plants of dietary importance such as leafy greens grown to different stages of maturity (microgreens to mature greens). Subobjective 3A: Manipulate oxalate catabolism in leafy greens. Subobjective 3B: Assess the impact of oxalate catabolism on leafy green growth. Subobjective 3C: Assess the impact of the manipulation of oxalate catabolism on the nutritional quality of leafy greens.

Approach:
Although oxalic acid is known to impact numerous biological processes in a broad range of organisms, our understanding of the mechanisms regulating its turnover are not well understood. This is especially true in plants. To begin to fill these gaps in our knowledge we plan to first assess the oxalate catabolic activity in low and high oxalate plants of dietary importance at different stages of development.The information gained from the assessment would be of use to consumers trying to reduce dietary oxalate loads and scientists interested in gaining new insights into the mechanisms regulating oxalate metabolism in plants. We will also identify and characterize in a model plant system the genes and encoded proteins responsible for each step in the CoA-dependent pathway of oxalate catabolism. The findings obtained will contribute significantly to our understanding of oxalate turnover and will set a foundation for future investigations into oxalate metabolism in a number of organisms ranging from microbes to plants.