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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Pathogen Reduction and Processing Parameters in Poultry Processing Systems

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety Research

Title: The Impact of Yeast Culture Residue on the Suppression of Dietary Aflatoxin on the Performance of Broiler Breeder Hens

Authors
item Stanley, Victor -
item Winsman, M -
item Dunkley, Claudia -
item Ogunleye, T -
item Daley, M -
item Krueger, W. -
item Sefton, A. -
item HINTON, JR., ARTHUR

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Poultry Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 31, 2003
Publication Date: March 1, 2004
Citation: Stanley, V.G., Winsman, M., Dunkley, C., Ogunleye, T., Daley, M., Krueger, W.F., Sefton, A.E., Hinton Jr, A. 2004. The Impact of Yeast Culture Residue on the Suppression of Dietary Aflatoxin on the Performance of Broiler Breeder Hens. Journal of Applied Poultry Research. 13:533-539.

Interpretive Summary: Experiments were performed to determine if providing yeast culture residues to layer hens could reduce harmful effects caused by the consumption of aflatoxin. Hens were provided fed containing aflatoxin, yeast culture residues, or aflatoxin and yeast culture residues. Eggs laid by the hens were collected each day and placed in an incubator for 3 weeks. The number of eggs laid by hens, percentage of fertile eggs, hatchability of eggs, egg weight, chick weight at hatch, and embryonic mortality were determined. Additionally at the end of the 3 week period, blood was collected from the hens and analyzed for total protein, globulin, and albumin. Results showed that consumption of aflatoxin did not negatively affect fertility; however, hens that consumed aflatoxin had significant reductions in egg production, percentage of hatchability, and embryonic mortality. Furthermore, serum total protein, globulin, and albumin in the blood of the hens provided aflatoxin were also significantly reduced. The addition of yeast culture residues to the diets of hens that had been provided aflatoxin produced significant increases in the level of hatchability, egg production, and significant decreases in embryonic mortality. Providing yeast culture residues to hens also increased serum globulin and albumin in the blood of the hens. Findings from these experiments showed that providing yeast culture extracts to hens that consume feed contaminated with aflatoxin may reduce several detrimental effects caused by this toxin.

Technical Abstract: A study was conducted to examine the effect of yeast culture residue (YCR) on the suppression of aflatoxicosis in broiler breeder hens. One hundred twenty, 35-wk-old, Cobb broiler breeder hens of the same cross were fed diets supplemented with aflatoxin (AF) (0 or 3 mg/kg) and YCR (0 or 2 lb/ton) singly and combined in a 2 × 2 factorial designed experiment. The birds were randomly assigned to pens with 3 replicates of 10 females and 1 male per treatment. Eggs laid by the hens were collected daily, stored at room temperature, and incubated every 7 d for 3 wk. Response variables analyzed were mean percentage of fertility, hatchability, hen-day egg production, egg weight, chick weight at hatch, and embryonic mortality over the 3-wk treatment period. At the end of 3-wk treatment, blood was collected from the hens and analyzed for total protein, globulin, and albumin. Aflatoxin did not negatively affect fertility. However, hen-day egg production (57.6%), percentage of hatchability (67.6%), embryonic mortality (24%), serum total protein, globulin, and albumin were significantly (P < 0.05) affected by AF. Hatch of fertile eggs from the AF-fed hens was significantly lower than the control (67.6 vs. 78.5%). The inclusion of YCR in the AF-treated diet raised the level of hatchability (74.9 vs. 67.6%), egg production (65.83 vs. 57.26%), and lowered embryonic mortality (16.8 vs. 24%). Serum globulin and albumin were lowered in the AF-fed hens but was partially restored with the addition of YCR. The data demonstrated that YCR may enhance the performance of broiler breeder hens that are provided feed contaminated with AF.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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