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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Improving bioenergy and forage plants and production systems for the central U.S.

Location: Grain, Forage & Bioenergy Research

Title: Grow them and we will come for the feast

Authors
item Heng-Moss, Tiffany -
item Bradshaw, Jeff -
item Koch, Kyle -
item Prochaska, Travis -
item Donze-Reiner, Teresa -
item Sarath, Gautam

Submitted to: Biofuels, Bioproducts, & Biorefining (Biofpr)
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 10, 2014
Publication Date: March 31, 2014
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/59007
Citation: Heng-Moss, T.M., Bradshaw, J.D., Koch, K.G., Prochaska, T., Donze-Reiner, T., Sarath, G. 2014. Grow them and we will come for the feast. Biofuels, Bioproducts, & Biorefining (Biofpr). 8: 145-146.

Interpretive Summary: Perennial grasses such as switchgrass are being developed as sources of biomass for the biofuel sector. However, there is limited knowledge on the types of insect pests that could pose a problem if these grasses are cultivated on a large-scale. Recent reports suggest that many types of insects could feed on these grass species and potentially compromise biomass yields. Understanding these plant-insect interactions will be needed to develop sustainable, integrated pest management strategies.

Technical Abstract: Perennial grasses such as switchgrass are likely to become dedicated biomass crops. However, there is limited knowledge on the types of insect pests that could pose a problem if these grasses are cultivated on a large-scale. Recent reports suggest that different classes of insect have the ability to become pests of these grasses. Understanding these plant-insect interactions will be needed to develop sustainable, integrated pest management strategies.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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