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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF TOOLS FOR INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT OF STABLE FLIES

Location: Agroecosystem Management Research

Title: Evaluation of methods for collecting blood-engorged mosquitoes from habitats within a wildlife refuge

Authors
item Friesen, Kristina
item Johnson, Greg -

Submitted to: Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 16, 2013
Publication Date: June 1, 2013
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/56983
Citation: Friesen, K.M., Johnson, G.D. 2013. Evaluation of methods for collecting blood-engorged mosquitoes from habitats within a wildlife refuge. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. 29(2):102-107. Available: http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.2987/12-6323R.1.

Interpretive Summary: Mortality of American white pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos Gmelin) chicks attributed to West Nile virus prompted field studies on the bionomics of mosquitoes on a wildlife refuge in northern Montana. One component of these studies was to identify blood meal sources for Culex tarsalis Coquillett, the primary vector of WNV in the region, and the potential bridge vectors Aedes vexans (Meigen) and Culiseta inornata (Williston). To accomplish this, three methods were evaluated to collect blood-fed mosquitoes: a gasoline powered aspirator, CO2-baited light traps, and fiber pots in three habitats that consisted of stands of deciduous trees and shrubs, marshes along the lake edge, and prairie grasses. Overall, fiber pots were the most efficient method for collecting engorged Cx. tarsalis and Cs. inornata, largely due to shorter sampling and processing times. The optimal location for collecting Cx. tarsalis was dependent on trapping method. Aspirations and fiber pot placements collected more Cx. tarsalis in tree stands while light traps collected more Cx. tarsalis in the marsh habitat. Sixteen avian and four mammalian hosts were identified from 95 blood-fed Cx. tarsalis with 46 blood meals derived from birds and 49 from mammals. Aedes vexans and Cs. inornata fed predominantly on white-tailed deer and cattle, respectively.

Technical Abstract: Mortality of American white pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos Gmelin) chicks attributed to West Nile virus prompted field studies on the bionomics of mosquitoes on a wildlife refuge in northern Montana. One component of these studies was to identify blood meal sources for Culex tarsalis Coquillett, the primary vector of WNV in the region, and the potential bridge vectors Aedes vexans (Meigen) and Culiseta inornata (Williston). To accomplish this, three methods were evaluated to collect blood-fed mosquitoes: a gasoline powered aspirator, CO2-baited light traps, and fiber pots in three habitats that consisted of stands of deciduous trees and shrubs, marshes along the lake edge, and prairie grasses. Overall, fiber pots were the most efficient method for collecting engorged Cx. tarsalis and Cs. inornata, largely due to shorter sampling and processing times. The optimal location for collecting Cx. tarsalis was dependent on trapping method. Aspirations and fiber pot placements collected more Cx. tarsalis in tree stands while light traps collected more Cx. tarsalis in the marsh habitat. Sixteen avian and four mammalian hosts were identified from 95 blood-fed Cx. tarsalis with 46 blood meals derived from birds and 49 from mammals. Aedes vexans and Cs. inornata fed predominantly on white-tailed deer and cattle, respectively.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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