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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF XYLELLA FASTIDIOSA (XF) AND OTHER EXOTIC AND INVASIVE DISEASES AND INSECT PESTS Title: Development and use of recombinant Homalodisca coagulata Virus-1 for controlling Homalodisca vitripennis, the glassy-winged sharpshooter

Authors
item Falk, Bryce -
item Miller, W. Allen -
item Bonning, Bryony -
item Stenger, Drake
item Choi, Soon -
item Kamita, Shizuo -

Submitted to: CDFA Pierce's Disease Control Program Research Symposium
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 2011
Publication Date: November 9, 2011
Citation: Falk, B.W., Miller, W., Bonning, B., Stenger, D.C., Choi, S.H., Kamita, S.G. 2011. Development and use of recombinant Homalodisca coagulata Virus-1 for controlling Homalodisca vitripennis, the glassy-winged sharpshooter. CDFA Pierce's Disease Control Program Research Symposium. p. 32-36.

Interpretive Summary: The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis) transmits the bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa, which causes Pierce’s disease of grapevines. Currently, the only effective control for GWSS relies on repeated application of insecticides. Homalodisca coagulata virus 1 (HoCV1) is a naturally occurring virus infecting GWSS. This newly initiated research project will modify HoCV-1 for delivery of toxic peptides and/or interfering RNA (RNAi) to GWSS with the goal of developing an effective biological control agent specifically targeting GWSS.

Technical Abstract: The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS; Homalodisca vitripennis) is an efficient vector of Xylella fastidiosa, causal agent of Pierce’s disease of grapevines. The goal of this research is to generate recombinant insect viruses to deliver toxic peptides and/or induce systemic RNA interference (RNAi) and thereby induce mortality in recipient GWSS. Homalodisca coagulata virus-1 (HoCV-1) is being modified to deliver and express toxic peptides and/or effector RNAs only upon infection of recipient GWSS. Results obtained from these studies will be used to develop an effective biological-based control strategy to help control GWSS and other sharpshooter vectors of X. fastidiosa.

Last Modified: 10/26/2014
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