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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Insecticide Resistance Management and New Control Strategies for Pests of Corn, Cotton, Sorghum, Soybean, and Sweet Potato

Location: Southern Insect Management Research Unit

Title: Differential resistance and cross-resistance to three phenylpyrazole insecticides in the Brown Planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Homoptera: Delphacidae)

Authors
item Zhao, Xinghua -
item He, Zuoping -
item He, Yueping -
item Shen, Jinliang -
item Su, Jianya -
item Gao, Congfen -
item Zhu, Yu Cheng

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 8, 2011
Publication Date: August 1, 2011
Citation: Zhao, X., He, Z., He, Y., Shen, J., Su, J., Gao, C., Zhu, Y. 2011. Differential resistance and cross-resistance to three phenylpyrazole insecticides in the Brown Planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Homoptera: Delphacidae). Journal of Economic Entomology. 104(4):1364-1368.

Interpretive Summary: Cross-resistance to two fipronil analogs, butene-fipronil and ethiprole were detected in fipronil-resistant field populations and a resistant laboratorial strain of the brown planthopper, although the two analogs have not been used widely in rice-growing areas in China. The results showed that six field populations with 24.7~44.9-fold resistance to fipronil had reached a higher level of cross-resistance to ethiprole (Resistance ratio=45.1~96.6-fold) and had a minor level cross-resistance (3.4~8.3-fold) to butene-fipronil. After 10 generation selections, resistance ratio to fipronil increased from 7.3-fold to 41.3-fold. At the same time, the insect increased cross-resistance ratio to ethiprole from 16.3-fold to 65.6-fold, while it had only minor increase in cross-resistance to butene-fipronil from 2.8-fold to 4.0-fold. These results confirmed that fipronil-resistant plathoppers could develop a higher level of cross-resistance to ethiprole, while it still maintained a lower level cross-resistance to butene-fipronil. Our data suggest that ethiprole is not a suitable alternative for controlling brown planthopper, once the insect has developed a high level resistance to fipronil. Further investiga

Technical Abstract: Cross-resistance to two fipronil analogs, butene-fipronil and ethiprole were detected in fipronil-resistant field populations and a resistant laboratorial strain of the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, although the two analogs have not been used widely in rice-growing areas in China. The results showed that six field populations with 24.7~44.9-fold resistance to fipronil had reached a higher level of cross-resistance to ethiprole (RR=45.1~96.6-fold) and had a minor level cross-resistance (RR=3.4~8.3-fold) to butene-fipronil. After 10 generation selections, resistance ratio to fipronil increased from 7.3-fold to 41.3-fold. At the same time, the insect increased cross-resistance ratio to ethiprole from 16.3-fold to 65.6-fold, while it had only minor increase in cross-resistance to butene-fipronil from 2.8-fold to 4.0-fold. These results confirmed that fipronil-resistant N. lugens could develop a higher level of cross-resistance to ethiprole, while it still maintained a lower level cross-resistance to butene-fipronil. Our data suggest that ethiprole is not a suitable alternative for controlling N. lugens, once the insect has developed a high level resistance to fipronil. Further investigation is necessary to understand the cross-resistance mechanisms in N. lugens.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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