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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF HEMIPTERA AND RELATED GROUPS: PLANT PESTS, PREDATORS, AND DISEASE VECTORS

Location: Systematic Entomology

Title: Ectoparasites Collected from the Common Yellowthroat on Vaca Key, Florida

Authors
item Hribar, L. -
item Miller, Gary

Submitted to: Florida Field Naturalist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 21, 2011
Publication Date: January 1, 2012
Citation: Hribar, L.J., Miller, G.L. 2012. Ectoparasites Collected from the Common Yellowthroat on Vaca Key, Florida. Florida Field Naturalist. 39(4):138-141.

Interpretive Summary: Birds can transport insects and mites of agricultural importance. Examination of two recently dead specimens of the common yellowthroat bird revealed two species of mites (one undescribed) and a single species of an agriculturally important thrips. This observation provides new records of association, and information regarding ways agriculturally important insects and mites can be transported by other animals. This information is useful to ecologists, economic entomologists and acarologists, ornithologists, and federal and state regulatory agencies

Technical Abstract: There are very few records of ectoparasites from the common yellowthroat bird, Geothlypis trichas (L.). Examination of the bodies of two recently killed common yellowthroats revealed both mite and thrips associated arthropods. All species of mites were determined to be an undescribed species of Proctophyllodidae, Amerodectes cf. geothlypis (Acari: Astigmata) and a single male Analges sp. (Astigmata: Analgidae). The thrips was determined as the agriculturally important species, Frankliniella bispinosa (Morgan). Such associations represent important additions to knowledge on vertebrate/invertebrate associations as well as information related to possible modes of transport for agriculturally important arthropods. This information is useful to ecologists, economic entomologists and acarologists, ornithologists, and federal and state regulatory agencies.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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