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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: METABOLIC VARIABLES AFFECTING THE EFFICACY, SAFETY, AND FATE OF AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS

Location: Animal Metabolism-Agricultural Chemicals Research

Title: Effects of liquid swine manure on dissipation of 17ß-estradiol in soil

Authors
item Zitnick, Kim -
item Shappell, Nancy
item Hakk, Heldur
item Desutter, Thomas -
item Khan, Eakalak -
item Casey, Francis -

Submitted to: Journal of Hazardous Materials
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 26, 2010
Publication Date: February 11, 2011
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/54259
Citation: Zitnick, K.K., Shappell, N.W., Hakk, H., DeSutter, T.M., Khan, E., Casey, F.X.M. 2011. Effects of liquid swine manure on dissipation of 17ß-estradiol in soil. Journal of Hazardous Materials. 186:1111-1117.

Interpretive Summary: 17ß-estradiol (E2) is a potent reproductive hormone, and is known as an endocrine disrupting compound when exposed to non-target species in the environment. Previous studies have shown that E2 degrades within hours and bind strongly to soils and sediments, therefore, its frequent presence in environmental samples at concentrations that impact water quality is occurring by an unknown mechanism. Colloidal (COC) and dissolved (DOC) organic carbon may constitute the unknown mechanism that enhances the persistence and mobility of E2. Soil batch experiments were used to identify the persistence and sorption of radiolabelled E2 dissolved in solutions of (i) COC/DOC derived from liquid swine manure and (ii) CaCl2 solution that contained no COC/DOC. E2 disappeared from the aqueous phase within a week in the CaCl2 solution, yet persisted for 14 d in the liquid manure solution. E2 readily degraded to estrone (E1; a metabolite of E2) in sterile batch experiments, which apparently can occur without biological activity. The COC/DOC in the liquid manure solution appeared to interact with the E2, reducing E2 degradation. Furthermore, the liquid manure solution reduced E2/E1 binding to the soil surface resulting in more E2/E1 in the aqueous layer compared to the CaCl2 solution. Ultrafiltration demonstrated that ~1/3 of E2 was associated with the COC in liquid manure, and at least partially responsible for a reduced degradation and enhanced persistence and mobility of E2 in the aqueous layer.

Technical Abstract: 17ß-estradiol (E2), an estrogenic hormone, degrades within hours and bind strongly to soils and sediments; however, estrogens are frequently detected in the environment at concentrations that impact water quality. Colloidal (COC) and dissolved (DOC) organic carbon may enhance the persistence and mobility of E2. Soil batch experiments were used to identify the persistence and sorption of radiolabelled E2 dissolved in solutions of (i) COC/DOC derived from liquid swine manure and (ii) CaCl2. Estradiol disappeared from the aqueous phase before 7 d in the CaCl2 solution, yet persisted throughout the duration of the 14 d experiment in the liquid manure solution. There was also concomitant formation of estrone (E1; a metabolite of E2) as E2 dissipated in sterile batch experiments, which was attributed to abiotic oxidation. The liquid manure solution appeared to interact with the estrogen and/or oxidation reaction sites, reducing E2 degradation. Furthermore, the liquid manure solution reduced E2/E1 binding to the soil surface resulting in more E2/E1 in the aqueous layer compared to the CaCl2 solution. Ultrafiltration results of liquid manure indicated that ~1/3 of E2 was associated with COC, which may be responsible for the reduced degradation and sorption of E2 in the liquid manure solution.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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