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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Dietary patterns associated with metabolic syndrome, sociodemographic and lifestyle factors in young adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study

Authors
item Deshmukh-Taskar, Priya -
item O'Neil, Carol -
item Nicklas, Theresa -
item Yang, Su-Jau -
item Liu, Yan -
item Gustat, Jeanette -
item Berenson, Gerald -

Submitted to: Public Health Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 20, 2009
Publication Date: September 11, 2009
Citation: Deshmukh-Taskar, P.R., O'Neil, C.E., Nicklas, T.A., Yang, S., Liu, Y., Gustat, J., Berenson, G.S. 2009. Dietary patterns associated with metabolic syndrome, sociodemographic and lifestyle factors in young adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study. Public Health Nutrition. 12(12): 2493-2503.

Interpretive Summary: Dietary patterns are important in identifying relationships between the occurrences of diseases, such as, the metabolic syndrome. Specifically, a prudent balanced dietary pattern may be helpful in preventing metabolic syndrome in this sample of Bogalusa Heart Study young adults. More studies are warranted to confirm these findings in other populations. Nonetheless, nutrition intervention programs for young adults to promote healthy dietary and lifestyle habits tailored-based on their Social Economic Status, demographic and lifestyle characteristics may be beneficial.

Technical Abstract: Our objective was to examine the association between dietary patterns (DP) and risk for metabolic syndrome (MetS); and to identify differences in DP by socio-economic, demographic and lifestyle factors. Dietary intake (from an FFQ), anthropometric/biochemical parameters and sociodemographic/lifestyle information (from a self-reported questionnaire)were evaluated, using a cross-sectional design. Statistical methods included principal component factor analysis, analysis of covariance and linear regression. All analyses were covariate-adjusted. The Bogalusa Heart Study (1995–1996)was evaluated. The subjects included young adults (19–39 years; n 995; 61% females/39% males; 80% whites/20% blacks), from a semi-rural southern US community were examined. Our results showed, that the 'Western Dietary Pattern' (WDP) consisted of refined grains, French fries, high-fat dairy foods, cheese dishes, red meats, processed meats, eggs, snacks, sweets/desserts, sweetened beverages, and condiments. The 'Prudent Dietary Pattern' (PDP) consisted of whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits, 100% fruit juices, low-fat dairy products, poultry, clear soups, and low-fat salad dressings. The DP explained 31% of the dietary intake variance. Waist circumference (P greater than 0.02), triceps skinfold (P equal to 0.01), plasma insulin (P equal 0.03), serum TAG (P equal 0.05), and the occurrence of MetS (P equal 0.03) were all inversely associated with PDP. Insulin sensitivity (P less than 0.0005) was positively associated with PDP. Serum HDL cholesterol (P equals 0.05) was inversely associated with WDP. Blacks consumed more servings from WDP than whites (P equals 0.02). Females consumed more servings from PDP than males (P equals 0.002). Those with greater than 12 years of education consumed more servings from PDP than their counterparts (P less than 0.0001). Current smokers consumed more servings from WDP than current non-smokers did(P less than 0.0001). Physically very active young adults consumed fewer servings from WDP than their sedentary counterparts (P equal 0.02). We concluded that more studies are warranted to confirm these findings in other populations.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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