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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY OF POND-RAISED CHANNEL CATFISH

Location: Warmwater Aquaculture Research Unit

Title: Swimming Performance and Metabolism of Golden Shiners

Authors
item Beecham, R -
item Pearson, Philip
item Labarre, S -
item Minchew, C -

Submitted to: North American Journal of Aquaculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 2008
Publication Date: January 1, 2009
Citation: Beecham, R.V., Pearson, P.R., Labarre, S.B., Minchew, C.D. 2009. Swimming Performance and Metabolism of Golden Shiners. North American Journal of Aquaculture. 71:59-63.

Interpretive Summary: This study was initiated in response to questions raised by baitfish producers concerning the energetic cost of the harvest and transportation of golden shiners. The swimming performance and metabolism of golden shiners was examined using swim tunnel respirometery. The oxygen consumption and tail beat frequencies at various swimming speeds, an estimation of the standard metabolic rate, and the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) were determined for shiners swum in ten groups of five individuals. Data from these experiments have been published in a peer reviewed journal and presented at scientific meetings.

Technical Abstract: The swimming ability and metabolism of golden shiners, Notemigonus crysoleucas, was examined using swim tunnel respirometery. The oxygen consumption and tail beat frequencies at various swimming speeds, an estimation of the standard metabolic rate, and the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) was determined for shiners swum in groups of five individuals. Oxygen consumption and tail beat frequencies both increased as swimming speed increased, and the standard metabolic rate was estimated at 131.22 mg O2/kg/h for individual fish. The Ucrits were determined for the first, second, and third fish in the group of five to fatigue (38.02, 41.72, and 47.24 cm/s respectively). Total cost of transport was lowest at 40 cm/s (0.36 cal/g/km). Net cost of transport was also lowest at 40 cm/s (0.085 cal/g/km). These results suggest that swimming efficiency is optimal at 40 cm/s and future design of equipment used in baitfish aquaculture could incorporate this information to help maximize their fish growth.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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