Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: WEED BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY, AND DEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINABLE INTEGRATED WEED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR COTTON, SOYBEAN, CORN

Location: Crop Production Systems Research Unit

Title: Gypsy Sedge or Just Another Non-native Invasive Weedy Sedge

Author
item Bryson, Charles

Submitted to: Popular Publication
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: May 21, 2009
Publication Date: June 18, 2009
Citation: Bryson, C.T. 2009. Gypsy Sedge or Just Another Non-native Invasive Weedy Sedge. Popular Publication. pp. 5.

Technical Abstract: Non-native weeds present a huge threat to agricultural and non-agricultural lands throughout the U.S.A. Blue sedge (Carex breviculmis R. Br.: Cyperaceae) is a non-native invasive weed discovered in North America in 2007. The sedge is native of Asia, Australia, and the Indian Subcontinent where it is a weed. Surveys determined that populations of blue sedge are from cemeteries and lawns and along railroads in Lauderdale and Newton counties, Mississippi. This species appears to be well established, maintaining viable populations from year to year, and has become weedy. The most probable means of introduction seems to be from human visits to This plant does not seem to present the threat and control challenges of the nutsedge species, but its populations sizes and ability to spread seem to point to another headache for the lawn and turf world. the Rose Hill Cemetery where Gypsy (Roma) royalty is buried and secondarily to other cemeteries and construction sites from contaminated soil and mowing, weed-eating, and grave digging equipment. This plant does not seem to present the threat and control challenges of nutsedge species, but its population sizes and ability to spread are factors that make it a threat in fruit and nut crops, lawns, and turf in the U.S.A.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page