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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EFFICIENT MANAGEMENT AND USE OF ANIMAL MANURE TO PROTECT HUMAN HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

Location: Food Animal Environmental Systems Research Unit

Title: Sulphate Adsorption in Soils of North and Northeast Iran.

Authors
item Shahsavani, S -
item Ardalan, M -
item Sistani, Karamat

Submitted to: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 9, 2005
Publication Date: June 20, 2006
Citation: Shahsavani, S., Ardalan, M., Sistani, K.R. 2006. Sulphate Adsorption in Soils of North and Northeast Iran.. Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis. 37:1587-1596.

Interpretive Summary: Gypsum (calcium sulfate) is used in agriculture both as a source of calcium (Ca) and sulfate (SO4), also as an amendment to improve soil structure. The effect of gypsum application on the adsorption of sulfate in irrigated and non-irrigated soils was examined. Almost all of the indigenous sulfate in soils with moderate pH values (>6) was found to be highly susceptible to leaching. The adsorption of sulfate to the soils receiving no gypsum was greater at 0 kg sulfur (S)/ha as compared to the soils received 40 kg S/ha of gypsum as fertilizer in Golesthan Province. The same trend was observed in Khorasan Province with soils receiving 0 and 40 kg S/ha, respectively. The results were more pronounced in irrigated field for both provinces. The amount of sulfate adsorption in Golesthan Province soils was comparatively greater than soils of Khorasan Province. The results raise questions regarding the efficiency of SO4 –containing fertilizers in correcting and preventing S deficiency in situations where leaching is a concern.

Technical Abstract: Gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) is used in agriculture both as a source of calcium (Ca) and sulphate (SO4) and as an amendment to improve soil structure. The effect of gypsum on the adsorption of SO4 in irrigated and nonirrigated soils was examined. Almost all of the indigenous sulphate (SO4) in a range of Golesthan and North Khorasan soils with moderate pH values (>6) was found to be present in the soil solution and, as a consequence, was highly susceptible to leaching. The adsorption of sulphate to the soils receiving no gypsum was greater with correlation coefficient of r=0.91 at 0 kg S ha-1 as compared to the soils received 40 kg ha-1 of gypsum as fertilizer with the value of r=0.88 in Golesthan Province. The same trend was observed in Khorasan Province with r=0.79 and r=0.75 with soils receiving 0 and 40 kg S ha-1, respectively. The results were more pronounced in irrigated field for both provinces. The amount of sulphate adsorption in Golesthan Province soils was comparatively greater than soils of Khorasan Province. The results raise questions regarding the efficiency of SO4 –containing fertilizers in correcting and preventing S deficiency in situations where leaching is a concern.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014
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