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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF MOTHS, LEAFHOPPERS, AND TRUE BUGS OF IMPORTANCE TO AGRICULTURAL, FOREST, AND ORNAMENTAL PLANTS Title: Key to the larvae of Castanea-feeding Olethreutinae frequently intercepted at U.S. ports-of-entry

Authors
item Brown, John
item Komai, F. - UNIV. OF OSAKA, JAPAN

Submitted to: Tropical Lepidoptera
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 29, 2001
Publication Date: June 15, 2008
Citation: Brown, J.W., Komai, F. 2008. Key to the larvae of Castanea-feeding Olethreutinae frequently intercepted at U.S. ports-of-entry. Tropical Lepidoptera. 18:2-4.

Interpretive Summary: The larvae of six species of olethreutine moths are economically important pests of chestnut (Castanea spp.) outside of the U.S. Although commercial shipments of chestnuts imported into the U.S. are fumigated routinely, it is likely that hundreds of kg of chestnuts enter this country illegally each year; chestnuts are intercepted frequently by USDA/APHIS/PPQ inspectors at ports-of-entry in personal baggage and other cargo. A key to the larvae of these six potentially invasive species is presented, along with summary descriptions and select references to information on their biology, detection, and control in association with chestnuts. This information will be valuable for APHIS quarantine personnel and other action agencies whose goal is the exclusion of potential invasive species.

Technical Abstract: At least six species of olethreutine moths are common pests of chestnut (Castanea spp.) outside of the U.S. Three are native to, or naturalized in the Mediterranean Region of Europe: Pammene fasciana (L.), Cydia splendana (Hübner), and Cydia fagiglandana (Zeller). Three are native to the Far East: Eucoenogenes aestuosa (Meyrick), Cydia kurokoi (Amsel), and Cydia glandicolana (Danilevsky). Chestnuts imported into the U.S. from these regions are fumigated routinely to kill these pests. However, larvae of these species frequently are encountered by agricultural inspectors at ports-of-entry in personal baggage and other cargo. A key to the larvae of these six species is presented, along with summary descriptions and select references to information on their biology, detection, and control in association with chestnuts.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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