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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Child physical activity and parent-child attitude congruence of athletic competence and activity type

Authors
item Anderson, Cheryl
item Hughes, Sheryl
item Fuemmeler, Bernard - DUKE UNIV., DURHAM, NC

Submitted to: Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 21, 2007
Publication Date: March 21, 2007
Citation: Anderson, C.B., Hughes, S.O., Fuemmeler, B.F. 2007. Child physical activity and parent-child attitude congruence of athletic competence and activity type [abstract]. Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 33(Suppl):S201.

Technical Abstract: Our purpose was to evaluate parental influence on child physical activity (PA) through parental beliefs on child competence and importance of specific types of PA. Utilizing Eccles' expectancy-value model of task choice, the study examined parent-child attitude congruence and whether task value beliefs for organized team (e.g., basketball)or individually performed PA/sports (e.g., running, swimming, walking) were better predictors of PA than competency beliefs. Structural equation modeling (LISREL 8.7) was used to examine cross sectional responses from 645 parents (63.0% F, 58.8% white, 26.2% Hisp) and 433 children (53.5% F, 9.9 yrs). PA was assessed by the PAQ-C, number team and individual PA/sports in last year. Latent-variable path analyses by child-gender showed stronger associations between parent and child beliefs on competence and value of both team and individual PA/sports for boys than girls. In models for value of team sports, value was more strongly related to PA (est a =.74) in girls than competency (est a =.53), while they were more equal predictors in boys (est ac = 57, est av =.51). In models for value of individually performed PA/sports, competency was more strongly related to PA (est a =.60) in girls than value (est a =.31), while the opposite was true for boys(est ac =.57, est av =.70). Child beliefs on competency and value of team sports completely mediated the direct effect of parental beliefs in boys and girls (boys' indirect parental effects: est ac =.24, est av =.20; girls' indirect parental effects: est ac =.12, est av =.28), while mediation effects for value of individual sports were found only for boys (boys' indirect parental effects: est av =.24). Effects of parental and child beliefs on competency and importance of doing PA depended on child gender and whether the PA was performed in a team context. While competency contributed substantially to PA in boys and girls, value of team sports in girls and value of activities outside of an organized team in boys were more highly related to PA.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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