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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Soil inoculants and yield of bell pepper and navy bean after peanut

Author
item Russo, Vincent

Submitted to: Horticulture Industries Show
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 7, 2006
Publication Date: January 10, 2006
Citation: Russo, V.M. 2006. Soil inoculants and yield of bell pepper and navy bean after peanut. Proceedings of Oklahoma-Arkansas Horticulture Industries Show. 25:116-118.

Interpretive Summary: Organisms present in the root zone can influence plant development. These organisms can change affect availability of nutrients to the plant, the ability of higher plants to take up nutrients, and provide a degree of protection against potential pathogens. These organisms can include bacteria or fungi. Soil was inoculated with species of Rhizobium bacteria; species of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM); both; or neither before, or at sowing of, peanut. One object was to determine if inoculation would affect yield or pod rating of peanut. An additional objective was to determine if effects of inoculation could be carried forward to vegetable crops planted in subsequent years. Yields and pod ratings of peanut, and yield of bell pepper or navy bean, were not affected by treatment. Existing populations of beneficial organisms may have been present in the soil and additional inoculation did not provide benefits to crops.

Technical Abstract: Soil organisms can have beneficial or detrimental effects on plants. Biotic amendments can be inoculated into the soil, and placed in proximity to plant roots. Inoculation of microorganisms in one year may provide benefits to crops that may be measurable over time. Soil was inoculated with species of Rhizobium bacteria; species of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM); both; or neither before, or at sowing of, peanut. Yields and pod ratings of peanut were determined. Treatments did not affect yield or pod rating for peanut. In two following years bell pepper or navy bean were planted into treated plots. Treatment did not affect yield of bell pepper or navy bean. Inoculation did not benefit crops. This may be because populations of these organisms may have been present in the soil, and inoculation with biotic organisms did not provide additional benefit.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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