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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Gibberellin Metabolism and Signaling

Authors
item Thomas, Stephen - IACR RESEARCH, UK
item Rieu, Ivo - IACR RESEARCH, UK
item STEBER, CAMILLE

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2004
Publication Date: February 1, 2005
Citation: Thomas, S.G., Rieu, I., Steber, C.M. 2005. Gibberellin metabolism and signaling. Chapter 9 In: Plant Hormones; Vitamins and Hormones Advances in Research and Applications. Ed. Gerald Litwack. Elsevier Publishing, Boston, MA. 72:289-339.

Interpretive Summary: Gibberellins (GAs) are a family of plant hormones controlling many aspects of plant growth and development including stem elongation, seed germination, and the transition to flowering. This chapter discusses what we know about production of the GA hormone itself, how the GA signal is perceived by plant cells, and development processes controlled by GA. The genes encoding enzymes responsible for GA hormone synthesis and break-down have been cloned. The expression of these genes is increased when there is little GA in the plant, and increased when there a much GA hormone in the plant. Perception of the GA signal by plant cells results in a decrease in accumulation of DELLA family proteins in all plant species examined so far. Genetic and biochemical analysis of GA signaling genes has revealed that posttranslational regulation of DELLA protein accumulation is a key control point in GA response. The highly conserved DELLA proteins are a family of negative regulators of GA signaling that appear subject to GA-stimulated degradation through the ubiquitin-26S proteasome pathway. This review discusses the regulation of GA hormone accumulation and signaling in the context of its role in plant growth and development.

Technical Abstract: Gibberellins (GAs) are a family of plant hormones controlling many aspects of plant growth and development including stem elongation, germination, and the transition from vegetative growth to flowering. Cloning of the genes encoding GA biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes has led to many insights into the developmental regulation of GA hormone accumulation which is subject both to positive and negative feedback regulation. Genetic and biochemical analysis of GA signaling genes has revealed that posttranslational reglation of DELLA protein accumulation is a key control point in GA response. The highly conserved DELLA proteins are a family of negative regulators of GA signaling that appear subject to GA-stimulated degradation through the ubiquitin-26S proteasome pathway. This review discusses the regulation of GA hormone accumulation and signaling in the context of its role in plant growth and development.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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