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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of ‘finch’ Winter Club Wheat

Authors
item Garland-Campbell, Kimberly
item Allan, Robert
item Anderson, J - UNIV OF MINNESOTA
item Pritchett, J - USDA RETIRED
item Little, Lynn
item Morris, Craig
item Line, R - USDA RETIRED
item Chen, Xianming
item Simmons, Kay
item Carter, B - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Burns, J - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Jones, S - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Reisenauer, P - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2005
Publication Date: June 24, 2005
Citation: Garland Campbell, K.A., Allan, R.E., Anderson, J., Pritchett, J.A., Little, L.M., Morris, C.F., Line, R.F., Chen, X., Simmons, K.W., Carter, B.P., Burns, J.W., Jones, S.S., Reisenauer, P.E. 2005. Registration of 'Finch' winter club wheat. Crop Science. 45:1657-1659.

Interpretive Summary: ‘Finch’, a soft white winter wheat variety, was developed by the USDA-ARS with assistance from the Washington Agricultural Experiment Station and the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station and released in February 2001. Finch was released because of its yield potential and disease resistance combined with the excellent end-use quality characteristics desired for soft white wheat in the Pacific Northwest. Finch is best suited to the low to intermediate rainfall zones of Washington State, Oregon, and northern Idaho, especially south of U.S. Route 2.

Technical Abstract: Finch soft white winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) (Reg. no. CV-966, PI 628640) was developed by the USDA-ARS with assistance from the Washington Agricultural Experiment Station and the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station and released in February 2001. Finch was released because of its yield potential and disease resistance combined with the excellent end-use quality characteristics desired for soft white wheat in the Pacific Northwest. Finch is best suited to the low to intermediate rainfall zones of Washington State, Oregon, and northern Idaho, especially south of U.S. Route 2.

Last Modified: 12/25/2014
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