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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Anthropometric, Parental, and Psychosocial Correlates of Dietary Intake of African-American Girls.

Authors
item Cullen, Karen
item Baranowski, Thomas
item Klesges, Lisa - UNIV OF TENNESSEE-MEMPHIS
item Watson, Kathy - BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MED
item Sherwood, Nancy - HEALTHPARTNERS RES FUND
item Story, Mary - UNIV OF MINNESOTA
item Zakeri, Issa
item Leachman-Slawson, Deborah - UNIV OF MEMPHIS-TENNESSEE
item Pratt, Charlotte - NAT HEART,LUNG&BLOOD INST

Submitted to: Obesity Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 1, 2004
Publication Date: September 1, 2004
Citation: Cullen, K., Baranowski, T., Klesges, L.M., Watson, K., Sherwood, N.E., Story, M., Zakeri, I., Leachman-Slawson, D., Pratt, C. 2004. Anthropometric, parental, and psychosocial correlates of dietary intake of African-American girls. Obesity Research. 12(suppl):20S-31S.

Interpretive Summary: This study identified the anthropometric, parental and, psychosocial characteristics, and specific meal practices (like breakfast skipping and number of meals and snacks consumed) that were related to consumption of total energy intake, percent energy from fat, fruit, 100% fruit juice, vegetables, sweetened beverages, and water among 114 8-10 year old African-American girls. The girls and a parent or primary caregiver completed several questionnaires. Two 24-hour dietary recalls were conducted with each girl. Height and weight were measured. In general, the number of meals and snacks consumed was related to energy intake. Lower body mass index (BMI) was related to higher vegetable consumption and the number of snacks consumed was positively related to sweetened beverage consumption. Greater low fat food preparation practices reported by parents was related to lower consumption of fat. Low-fat food preparation practices in the home appeared to be an important influence on fat consumption. Eating vegetables was related to lower BMI.

Technical Abstract: This paper identifies the anthropometric, parental and, psychosocial characteristics, and specific meal practices (e.g., breakfast skipping and number of meals and snacks consumed) that predicted consumption of total energy intake, percent energy from fat, fruit, 100% fruit juice, vegetables, sweetened beverages, and water among 8-10 year old African-American girls. Participants were 114 8-10 year old African-American girls and a parent or primary caregiver at three field centers. Girls and a parent or primary caregiver completed a battery of dietary questionnaires. Two 24-hour dietary recalls were conducted with each girl. Height and weight were measured. Separate hierarchical regression analyses with backward deletion were conducted for each dependent dietary variable, and potential field center differences were examined. In general, the number of meals and snacks consumed was correlated with energy intake. Lower body mass index (BMI) was related to higher vegetable consumption and the number of snacks consumed was positively related to sweetened beverage consumption. Greater low fat food preparation practices reported by parents was related to lower consumption of fat as a percentage of total energy. In conclusion, dietary behavior was complex and differed across geographic areas. Low-fat food preparation practices in the home appeared to be an important influence on the percent of energy consumed from fat. Greater vegetable consumption was associated with lower BMI.

Last Modified: 11/24/2014
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