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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Seasonal Patterns of Adult Thrips Dispersal and Implications for Management in Eastern Virginia Tomato Fields.

Authors
item Nault, Brian - CORNELL UNIV. ITHACA NY
item Speese, John - VIRGINIA POLYTECH INSTITU
item Jolly, Donald - VIRGINIA POLYTECH INSTITU
item Groves, Russell

Submitted to: Crop Protection Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2002
Publication Date: April 20, 2003
Citation: NAULT, B.A., SPEESE, J., JOLLY, D., GROVES, R.L. SEASONAL PATTERNS OF ADULT THRIPS DISPERSAL AND IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT IN EASTERN VIRGINIA TOMATO FIELDS.. CROP PROTECTION JOURNAL. 22:505-512

Interpretive Summary: Seasonal flight activity of thrips was examined in commercial tomato fields, Lycopersicon esculentum L., on Virginia's (USA) Eastern Shore in 2000 and 2001. In each of three regions along the Shore, populations of adult thrips activity infesting tomato flowers and those dispersing within tomato fields were monitored weekly. Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) was the only species captured that is considered as a competent vector of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). Seasonal patterns of F. fusca capture were dissimilar in tomato fields across all regions; yet, more F. fusca were captured between mid May and mid June in all regions compared with those captured between transplanting and mid May each year. Despite the relatively low observed dispersal activity of F. fusca before mid May, the threat of TSWV transmission warrants protection of the crop from immigrating F. fusca from transplanting until the end of marketable fruit set. Frankliniella tritici (Lindeman) was the most frequently encountered thrips species dispersing in tomato fields and was numerically dominant in tomato flowers. Seasonal patterns of F. tritici capture were similar in tomato fields in all regions in 2000, but were dissimilar among regions in 2001. Nevertheless, dispersal of F. tritici was most pronounced between mid May and mid June across all fields in each year. Because F. tritici was the dominant species recovered from tomato flowers, it is likely responsible for cosmetic injury to tomato fruit. F. tritici should be managed when infestations are highest, between mid May and mid June.

Technical Abstract: Seasonal flight activity of thrips was examined in commercial tomato fields, Lycopersicon esculentum L., on Virginia's (USA) Eastern Shore in 2000 and 2001. In each of three regions along the Shore, populations of adult thrips activity infesting tomato flowers and those dispersing within tomato fields were monitored weekly. Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) was the only species captured that is considered as a competent vector of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). Seasonal patterns of F. fusca capture were dissimilar in tomato fields across all regions; yet, more F. fusca were captured between mid May and mid June in all regions compared with those captured between transplanting and mid May each year. Despite the relatively low observed dispersal activity of F. fusca before mid May, the threat of TSWV transmission warrants protection of the crop from immigrating F. fusca from transplanting until the end of marketable fruit set. Frankliniella tritici (Lindeman) was the most frequently encountered thrips species dispersing in tomato fields and was numerically dominant in tomato flowers. Seasonal patterns of F. tritici capture were similar in tomato fields in all regions in 2000, but were dissimilar among regions in 2001. Nevertheless, dispersal of F. tritici was most pronounced between mid May and mid June across all fields in each year. Because F. tritici was the dominant species recovered from tomato flowers, it is likely responsible for cosmetic injury to tomato fruit. F. tritici should be managed when infestations are highest, between mid May and mid June.

Last Modified: 9/3/2014
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