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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: CONTROL OF IMMATURE AND ADULT GLASSY-WINGED SHARPSHOOTERS EVALUATION OF BIORATIONAL AND CONVENTIONAL INSECTICIDES

Authors
item Akey, David
item Blua, Matthew - UCR, RIVERSIDE, CA
item Henneberry, Thomas
item Civerolo, Edwin
item Toscano, Nick - UCR, RIVERSIDE, CA
item Wendel, Lloyd - USDA-APHIS, TX

Submitted to: CDFA Pierce's Disease Control Program Research Symposium
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: December 18, 2002
Publication Date: December 30, 2002
Citation: AKEY, D.H., BLUA, M., HENNEBERRY, T.J., CIVEROLO, E.L., TOSCANO, N.C., WENDEL, L. CONTROL OF IMMATURE AND ADULT GLASSY-WINGED SHARPSHOOTERS EVALUATION OF BIORATIONAL AND CONVENTIONAL INSECTICIDES. CDFA PIERCE'S DISEASE CONTROL PROGRAM RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM. 2002. pp. 133-135

Interpretive Summary: Pierce's disease, caused by Xylella fastidiosa has become an increasingly important factor in grape production in California since 1996. The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) is a primary X fastidiosa vector. Serious grape and vine losses have increased as GWSS numbers have increased in southern California (Blua et al. 1999). Purcell et al. (1999) suggested that diseases caused by X fastidiosa are likely to become more prevalent with increased numbers and spread of GWSS. Management methods are urgently needed for GWSS that are economically, ecologically and socially acceptable. Cultural and biological components of developing integrated pest management (IPM) strategies need to be melded with efficacious GWSS chemical control and insecticide resistance management (IRM), and integrated crop management (ICM) inputs. In 2000, we studied GWSS adulticides in grapes (Akey et al., 2001a). Our objectives in the two-year trials (2001-2002) were to identify selective, conventional and biorational insecticides that were efficacious for control of immature and adult GWSS in citrus.

Technical Abstract: Pierce's disease, caused by Xylella fastidiosa has become an increasingly important factor in grape production in California since 1996. The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) is a primary X fastidiosa vector. Serious grape and vine losses have increased as GWSS numbers have increased in southern California (Blua et al. 1999). Purcell et al. (1999) suggested that diseases caused by X fastidiosa are likely to become more prevalent with increased numbers and spread of GWSS. Management methods are urgently needed for GWSS that are economically, ecologically and socially acceptable. Cultural and biological components of developing integrated pest management (IPM) strategies need to be melded with efficacious GWSS chemical control and insecticide resistance management (IRM), and integrated crop management (ICM) inputs. In 2000, we studied GWSS adulticides in grapes (Akey et al., 2001a). Our objectives in the two-year trials (2001-2002) were to identify selective, conventional and biorational insecticides that were efficacious for control of immature and adult GWSS in citrus.

Last Modified: 10/31/2014
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