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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Corky Ringspot Disease: Review of the Current Situation

Authors
item Mojtahedi, H - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Santo, G - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Crosslin, James
item Brown, Charles
item Thomas, Peter

Submitted to: 2000 Proceedings Washington State Potato Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 1999
Publication Date: April 15, 2000
Citation: MOJTAHEDI, H., SANTO, G.S., CROSSLIN, J., BROWN, C.R., THOMAS, P.E. CORKY RINGSPOT DISEASE: REVIEW OF THE CURRENT SITUATION. 2000 PROCEEDINGS WASHINGTON STATE POTATO CONFERENCE. P 9-13. 2000.

Technical Abstract: Corky ringspot disease (CRS) of potato, Solanum tuberosum L, is caused by tobacco rattle virus (TRV) and vectored by stubby root nematodes (Trichodorus spp. and Paratrichodorus spp.) (Harrison and Robinson, 1986). The disease is characterized by arcs, concentric rings, or diffuse extensive browning of tuber flesh that later dries into cork-like tissue, which make the crop unsalable. CRS was first reported in Washington in 1976 (Thomas, 1976) but seldom considered as a serious threat to crop production. However, in recent years CRS has emerged as a more serious quality problem of potato and occasionally caused crop failures in upper and lower Columbia Basin (Thomas, et al, 1992). Extensive survey of potato fields in Washington and Oregon shows that TRV and its vector, Paratrichodorus allius, are present in the most of potato growing regions, and the vector is more prevalent (30 percent of fields) than the virus (3 percent of fields). The severity of CRS symptoms varies considerably in problem fields. In some fields the symptoms consist of typical arcs and concentric rings, and in others the dark brown-black necrotic tissue engulfs the entire tuber, and tissue rot is caused by secondary organisms. The variable virulence of virus strains isolated from these fields has recently been confirmed (Mojtahedi, et al, unpublished).

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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