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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Comparison of Poultry Meat at 4 C and 13 C by Digital Aroma Technology (Electronic Nose)

Authors
item Arnold, Judy
item Boothe, Dorothy

Submitted to: Southern Poultry Science Society Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 21, 1999
Publication Date: July 1, 2000
Citation: ARNOLD, J.W., BOOTHE, D.D. COMPARISON OF POULTRY MEAT AT 4 C AND 13 C BY DIGITAL AROMA TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONIC NOSE). SOUTHERN POULTRY SCIENCE SOCIETY MEETING ABSTRACT. 2000.

Technical Abstract: The quality of poultry meat stored at two temperatures for varying times was assessed by digital aroma technology (an electronic nose). Four types of meat (breast with skin, breast without skin, wings, and thighs) were collected aseptically from a processing line and stored at 4C for 1 to 5d or at 13C for 1 or 2d to represent cold storage and processing conditions. Meat samples were rinsed with sterile saline, and the rinses and their serial dilutions (in trypticase soy broth) were assayed using an electronic nose with an array of 12 metal oxide sensors. The resulting response curves for replicate samples were compared, and multivariate statistical analysis of data was performed. After 3d of storage at 4C of breast with skin and wing samples, differences were detected from rinses of each meat type. For breast without skin and thigh samples stored at 4C, no patterns of odors were evident from rinses of the respective meat type. The electronic nose also distinguished odors of all 4 meat types stored at 13C from each respective meat type stored at 4C. The length of storage (1 or 2d) of any type of meat could be differentiated at 13C. Analysis of rinse dilutions from meat samples demonstrated the sensitivity of the assay; differences in odors were detected after dilution of a rinse by 1 to 6 logs. Comparison of samples stored 1 or 2d at 4C with diluent showed that few volatiles were produced. The sensitivity increased for each meat type as the number of days in storage increased. Collectively, our data indicate the usefulness of the electronic nose in monitoring the quality of chicken meat maintained under varying storage times and temperatures common in poultry processing areas.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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