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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of F1015 and F1016 Sugarbeet Germplasms with Resistance to the Sugarbeet Root Maggot.

Authors
item CAMPBELL, LARRY
item Anderson, A - NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV
item Dregseth, Robert - NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 1999
Publication Date: July 1, 2000

Interpretive Summary: Sugarbeet root maggot is a serious pest of sugarbeet on much of the US acreage. The insect currently is controlled with insecticides applied at planting time. If the few insecticides being used were removed from the market or became ineffective due to the development of resistant maggot strains, yield losses would increase substantially in some growing areas. Effective genetic resistance to this pest would reduce the dependence on insecticides and its associated costs. Two germplasms, designated F1015 and F1015 were developed and are now available for distribution to commercial breeders. F1015 and F1016 currently are the only publicly available sugarbeet root maggot resistant germplasms in a sugarbeet type background. In addition to supplying a source of resistance to the maggot, these germplasms demonstrate a minimum level of resistance that is attainable if seed companies are willing to devote the necessary time and effort to a resistance breeding program.

Technical Abstract: Sugarbeet root maggot is a serious pest of sugarbeet on much of the US acreage. The insect currently is controlled with insecticides applied at planting time. If the few insecticides being used were removed from the market or became ineffective due to the development of resistance maggot strains, yield losses would increase substantially in some growing areas. Effective genetic resistance to this pest would reduce the dependence on insecticides and its associated costs. Two germplasm lines, designated F1015 and F1016 were developed and are currently available for distribution to commercial breeders. Root maggot damage, as evidence by number and size of feeding scars, is substantially less than that of any commercial hybrid tested. F1015 and F1016 provide a source for the development of agronomically acceptable populations and parental lines with resistance to the sugarbeet root maggot.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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