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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Storage Respiration of Liberty-Link Sugarbeet Hybrids

Authors
item Campbell, Larry
item Thorsness, Kevin - AGREVO
item Mayland, Paul - AGREVO

Submitted to: Sugarbeet Research and Extension Reports
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 13, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The commercialization of transgenic varieties of crop plants has made this new technology the subject of much discussion. Herbicide resistant transgenic sugarbeet hybrids are currently being examined on an experimental basis and likely will be the first transgenic sugarbeet grown commercially in the region. Producer interest in these hybrids is high, because of the additional weed control options they provide. Sugarbeets are unique in that they are stored in large exposed piles between harvesting and processing. During this storage period the roots continue to respire; consuming sugar in the process. Therefore; any change in production practice or genetic makeup of the hybrids that affects storage respiration rate is of economic importance. The objective of this study was to determine if the alien gene that provides resistance to Glufoniate-ammonium (a broad spectrum herbicide) affected respiration rate during storage. The results suggested that neither this particular introduction of a herbicide resistance gene nor the application of the corresponding herbicide affected storage respiration of sugarbeet.

Technical Abstract: The performance of transgenic sugarbeet hybrids with resistance to broad spectrum herbicides is of interest because of the additional weed control options they would provide. Once geneticist have identified and transferred an alien gene for herbicide resistance it is the task of plant breeders to combine herbicide resistance with acceptable yield and quality traits. After acceptable yield levels have been demonstrated other traits come under consideration. Respiration that occurs while the beets are piled is responsible for 50-70% of the sucrose loss that occurs during storage. The objective of this study was to determine if the alien gene that provides glufoinate-ammonium resistance affects storage respiration rate. Beets form two locations were stored for 60 days at 40 F and high humidity prior to determining respiration rate. The results suggested that neither this particular introduction of a herbicide resistance gene nor the application of the corresponding herbicide affected storage respiration rate of sugarbeet.

Last Modified: 4/24/2014
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