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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Effect of Gibberellic Acid on the Growth and Yield of Kenaf

Authors
item Ching, A - NORTHWEST MISSOURI STATE
item Walk, S - NORTHWEST MISSOURI STATE
item Webber, Charles

Submitted to: Kenaf Association International Conference Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 15, 1997
Publication Date: N/A

Technical Abstract: In Northwest Missouri, growers are interested in the field production kenaf for value-added products such as animal litter and potting media . An increase in the core and stalk yield of kenaf would create incentives for more growers to produce kenaf. Gibberellic acid (GA) is known for increasing the height of plants and considered as a potential plant growth regulator for kenaf. The objective of this study was to determine the affect of GA on growth and yield of kenaf. Seeds of kenaf cultivar 'Tainung #2' were planted 10 cm apart in 91 cm rows. The plots were fertilized with 150 kg/ha using a 13-13-13 complete fertilizer. The different plots were given treatments of GA (ProGibb) as follows: a) 1000 and 2000 ppm as single sprays on 7/16/96; b) 1000 and 2000 ppm as repeat spray on 8/13/96, a and b were sprayed initially when plants were 1 m tall; c) 1000 and 2000 ppm sprayed only on 8/13/96 for the first time; and d) control. No significant differences (P=0.05) were found between all treatments for the final average height. Similarly, no statistical differences were found between GA treatments and the control for kenaf average stalk yield and average fiber yield. However, a statistical difference was detected at P=0.01 between the application of 2000 ppm of GA and the rest of the GA treatments, except for the control. The results may have not shown significant differences at P=0.01 due to the lack of field plot isolation for each treatment. The growth response of plants to GA may have induced the nontreated plants to increase their growth due to additional light competition.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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