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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Use of Lipids in Edible Coatings for Food Products

Authors
item Baldwin, Elizabeth
item Nisperos, Myrna - DEPT AGRIC WERRIBEE AUSTR
item Hagenmaier, Robert
item Baker, Robert

Submitted to: Food Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 2, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: This paper is a review of the role of lipid and resin compounds in development of coatings for various food items. The lipid materials discussed include waxes, oils, and resins from plant, animal, and petroleum sources. Most coatings described are edible and used on fresh and lightly processed produce. There is some discussion, however, on use of lipids and dresins in coatings for processed foods, meat, and fish. In most cases, these coatings provide a means to extend product shelf life by retarding desiccation, providing a barrier to gas exchange, delaying undesirable color changes, or by improving cosmetic appearance by adding shine.

Technical Abstract: Lipid and resin materials play an important role in coatings for food items. These compounds include waxes, oils, and resins from plant, animal, and petroleum sources. Most coatings are edible and improve product shelf life or appearance. Important lipid components that are used as major ingredients in coatings include carnauba wax, beeswax, candelilla wax, paraffin wax and oil, mineral oil, and various vegetable oils. Important resin materials include shellac and wood rosin. Other lipid materials play an important role in coatings as minor ingredients such as acetylated monoglycerides, various fatty acids and their sucrose esters, the polysorbate family, and lecithin and its derivatives. These compounds aid in making emulsions (emulsifiers), improve surface tension properties (surface active agents), or improve coating plasticity (plasticizers).

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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