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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PATHOGEN PERSISTENCE AND PROCESSING OPTIMIZATION FOR ELIMINATION IN FOODS

Location: Food Safety and Intervention Technologies

Title: Shiga-toxin Escherichia coli(STEC) in the beef chain: assessing and mitigating the risk by translational science, education and outreach

Authors
item LUCHANSKY, JOHN
item PORTO-FETT, ANNA

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2013
Publication Date: August 1, 2013
Citation: Luchansky, J.B., Porto Fett, A.C. 2013. Shiga-toxin Escherichia coli(STEC) in the beef chain: assessing and mitigating the risk by translational science, education and outreach. Meeting Abstract. Federal Partners STEC Research Summit, Charlotte, NC., August 1-2, 2013., Volume 1, Page 1..

Technical Abstract: As stated in the promotional materials generated by the awardees, this $25 million Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Coordinated Agriculture Project (STEC CAP), coordinated through USDA’s Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) and administered through the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) was awarded to a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary team of land-grant universities and government agencies led by the University of Nebraska – Lincoln. The primary goal of this grant is to reduce the occurrence and public health risks from eight targeted serogroups/serotypes of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC-8) in beef using a quantitative microbial risk assessment platform. The team’s 50 investigators, from 12 U.S. institutions, bring to the project world class facilities, broad expertise, existing program infrastructure, access to beef production and processing operations, and strong stakeholder support. The purpose of this presentation is to elaborate on research and outreach activities being planned and/or conducted under each of the five main objectives of the STEC CAP, that being: i) detection, ii) biology and characterization, iii) interventions, iv) risk analysis and assessment, and v) risk management and communication. New and enhanced knowledge from this research will yield practical, effective information and communications tools to reduce STEC risk along the beef production to consumption continuum, with potential application to other pathogens and other commodities.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014