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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MANAGEMENT OF TEMPERATE FRUIT NUT AND SPECIALTY CROP GENETIC RESOURCES Title: Fragaria

Authors
item Hummer, Kim
item Bassil, Nahla
item Njuguna, Wambui -

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: June 10, 2010
Publication Date: February 20, 2011
Repository URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/978-3-642-16056-1/#section=859822&page=1
Citation: Hummer, K.E., Bassil, N.V., Njuguna, W. 2011. Fragaria. In: Kole, C. editor. Wild Crop Relatives: Genomics and Breeding Resources, Temperate Fruits. Berlin Germany: Springer. 6:17-44.

Interpretive Summary: Strawberries are native throughout the northern hemisphere, through Europe, East and Southeast Asia, North America (including Mexico), on a few Pacific Islands and into parts of South America. The majority of the 20+ wild strawberry species occur in Asia, although the two wild octoploid progenitors of the hybrid cultivated strawberry are American. These American strawberries, the Virginian with small red fruit, and a white-fruited landrace of the beach strawberry were brought to France in the 18th century from eastern North America and Chile. The origin of the hybrid strawberry is described. The classification of strawberry species and the number of chromosomes that they contain is listed. Classical and molecular genetic studies include morphological markers in addition to current progress in nuclear, chloroplast and mitochondrial markers. The genomics resources developed in strawberry contain alpine strawberry as a model perennial species. Functional improvements of strawberry are also discussed. The development of the global conservation strategy for strawbery genetic resources is described. The chapter finishes with a section on biotechnological approaches considering benefits and risks. While the cultivated strawberry is recognized as a significant economically important fruit, conservation support for wild relatives lags behind those of other economically and agriculturally important crops.

Technical Abstract: The native distribution for crop wild relatives of Fragaria is circumpolar boreal, through Europe, East and Southeast Asia, North America (including Mexico), on a few Pacific Islands and into parts of South America. The majority of the 20+ wild strawberry species occur in Asia, although the two wild octoploid progenitors of the hybrid cultivated strawberry, F. ×ananassa subsp. ananassa are American. These American strawberries, the Virginian (F. virginiana subsp. virginiana) with small red fruit, and a white-fruited landrace of the beach strawberry (F. chiloensis subsp. chiloensis forma chiloensis) were brought to France in the 18th century from eastern North America and Chile. The origin of the hybrid strawberry is described. The taxonomic classification of strawberry species and their ploidy is given. Classical and molecular genetic studies include morphological markers in addition to current progress in nuclear, chloroplast and mitochondrial markers. The genomics resources developed in strawberry contain F. vesca as a model perennial species. Functional improvements of strawberry are also discussed. The development of the global conservation strategy for strawbery genetic resources is described. The chapter finishes with a section on biotechnological approaches considering benefits and risks. While the cultivated strawberry is recognized as a significant economically important fruit, conservation support for wild relatives lags behind those of other economically and agriculturally important crops.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014