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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: VACCINOLOGY AND IMMUNITY OF AQUATIC ANIMALS Title: Zoonotic infections from fish and shellfish

Authors
item Haenen, Olga -
item Evans, Joyce
item Longshaw, Matt -

Submitted to: European Association of Fish Pathologists
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: April 23, 2009
Publication Date: September 14, 2009
Citation: Evans, J.J., Haenen, O., Lonshaw, M. 2009. Zoonotic infections from fish and shellfish. European Association of Fish Pathologists Bulletin vol ( )pg. . EAFP Workshop 14th Septenber 2009 Prague. http://eafp.org/storage/conference-articles/EAFP%202009%20zoonotic%20infections%20workshop%20report%20final%20version.pdf.

Interpretive Summary: The worldwide development of aquaculture and the worldwide transport of live aquaculture products has, apart from many advantages, also worrisome consequences. Among them is the occurrence and increased recognition of zoonotic disease agents causing epidemics and carrier states in cultured fish and shellfish and their transmission to humans resulting in mild to severe disease. Diagnosis of zoonotic infections in humans by clinicians is often hampered by a poor knowledge of zoonotic disease agents derived from aquatic species and associated clinical signs. The zoonotic infections can be divided into: 1) topically acquired (contact) zoonosis: risk groups: aquaculture professionals, fish culturists/processors/handlers & consumers 2) food borne (ingestion) zoonosis: risk group: consumers We organize this workshop based on the increasing cases of zoonotic agent detection that have resulted in both aquaculture and human diseases.. In this workshop we strive to present an overview of the prevalence and incidence of zoonotic infections and discuss the best management practices, including preventive measures, for aquaculture professionals, fish processors, and the consumers. Our focus is on principal zoonotic pathogens: Vibrio vulnificus, Streptococcus iniae, S. agalactiae, Edwardsiella tarda, Mycobacterium spp. and noroviruses (Norwalk-like viruses).

Technical Abstract: The worldwide development of aquaculture and the worldwide transport of live aquaculture products has, apart from many advantages, also worrisome consequences. Among them is the occurrence and increased recognition of zoonotic disease agents causing epidemics and carrier states in cultured fish and shellfish and their transmission to humans resulting in mild to severe disease. Diagnosis of zoonotic infections in humans by clinicians is often hampered by a poor knowledge of zoonotic disease agents derived from aquatic species and associated clinical signs.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014
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