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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF WEEDS ON WESTERN RANGELAND WATERSHEDS

Location: Exotic and Invasive Weeds Research

Title: Micro-morphological alterations in young rosette leaves of Dipsacus laciniatus L. (Dipsacaceae) caused by infestation of the eriophyid mite Leipotrix dipsacivagus Petanovic et Rector (Acari: Eriophyoidea) under laboratory con

Authors
item Pecinar, Linka -
item Stevanovic, Branka -
item Rector, Brian
item Petanovic, Radmila -

Submitted to: Arthropod-Plant Interactions
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 16, 2011
Publication Date: April 6, 2011
Citation: Pecinar, L., Stevanovic, B., Rector, B.G., Petanovic, R. 2011. Micro-morphological alterations in young rosette leaves of Dipsacus laciniatus L. (Dipsacaceae) caused by infestation of the eriophyid mite Leipotrix dipsacivagus Petanovic et Rector (Acari: Eriophyoidea) under laboratory con. Arthropod-Plant Interactions. 5(3):201-208. DOI 10.1007/s1189-011-9129-4.

Interpretive Summary: At least two species of teasels (Dipsacus spp.) are invasive weeds in the U.S. Teasels are native to Eurasia and have also become invasive in other parts of North and South America. A biological control program was initiated by USDA-ARS to seek and study insects and other natural enemies of teasels as potential agents of their control. This study describes the damaging effects to cut-leaf teasel caused by one such potential agent, the eriophyid mite Leipothrix dipsacivagus, which was discovered and described by an ARS scientist in collaboration with a foreign cooperator. This study shows that the mite causes considerable damage to the teasel plant and that the mite is worthy of further consideration as a potential teasel biological control agent.

Technical Abstract: The present study describes micro-morphological and hystological changes to the native Eurasian plant species Dipsacus laciniatus (Dipsacaceae) provoked by infestation of the eriophyid mite, Leipothrix dipsacivagus Petanovic et Rector. Conspicuous injuries to the leaf tissue were induced by mites feeding on young leaves of D. laciniatus plants that were propagated from seed under laboratory conditions. Anatomical injuries extended into epidermal cells on the upper and lower leaf surface and to the mesophyll layer of infested D. laciniatus leaves.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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