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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED CEREAL APHID MANAGMENT

Location: Wheat, Peanut and Other Field Crops Research

Title: Grain and vegetative biomass reduction by the Russian wheat aphid in winter wheat

Authors
item Mirik, Mustafa -
item Ansley, R -
item Michels, JR., G -
item Elliott, Norman

Submitted to: Southwestern Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2009
Publication Date: June 1, 2009
Citation: Mirik, M., Ansley, R.J., Michels Jr., G.J., Elliott, N.C. 2009. Grain and vegetative biomass reduction by the Russian wheat aphid in winter wheat. Southwestern Entomologist. 34(2):131-139.

Interpretive Summary: The Russian wheat aphid is a severe pest of wheat, barley, other small grains, and grasses. Although the Russian wheat aphid is a significant pest of small grains, its feeding effects on grain yield and vegetative biomass in large-scale wheat fields have not been well documented. Data were collected in dryland and irrigated wheat fields in Texas and Oklahoma during three years. The insect reduced grain yield 50.2 to 82.9% and biomass were 55.4 to 76.5%. These results highlight the extent of economic loss to winter wheat producers from Russian wheat aphid, and the importance of using optimal management practices to control the aphid and protect wheat yield.

Technical Abstract: The Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Mordvilko), is a severe pest of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), other small grains, and grasses. Although the Russian wheat aphid is a significant pest of small grains, its feeding effects on grain yield and vegetative biomass in large-scale wheat fields have not been well documented. Data were collected in dryland and irrigated wheat fields in Texas and Oklahoma during three years. The insect reduced grain yield 50.2 to 82.9% and biomass were 55.4 to 76.5%. These results suggested that winter wheat can suffer significant economic loss from Russian wheat aphid.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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