Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPING NOVEL PROCESSES FOR INCORPORATING THE UNIQUE NUTRITIONAL AMD FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF RICE INTO VALUE-ADDED PRODUCTS

Location: Food Processing and Sensory Quality Research

Title: Effects of air injection during sap processing on maple syrup color, chemical composition and flavor volatiles.

Authors
item Van Den Berg, A K -
item Perkins, T D -
item Isselhardt, M L -
item Godsall, Mary An -
item Lloyd, Steven

Submitted to: International Sugar Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2008
Publication Date: January 4, 2009
Citation: Van Den Berg, A., Perkins, T., Isselhardt, M., Godsall, M., Lloyd, S.W. 2009. Effects of air injection during sap processing on maple syrup color, chemical composition and flavor volatiles. International Sugar Journal. 111:1321.

Interpretive Summary: Sap collected from sugar maple trees is concentrated by boiling to make maple syrup. Lighter colored syrup is more economically valuable than dark syrup. Air injection during boiling has been promoted as a means of increasing the amount of light syrup produced, while also reducing scale formation on the boiling pan. These claims were evaluated. The results indicate that air injection produced syrup with a chemical composition consistent with pure maple syrup increased the amount of light-colored syrup produced, but did not reduce loose scale development or scale deposition. This work will help maple syrup producers to evaluate the cost and benefits of air injection technology.

Technical Abstract: Air injection (AI) is a maple sap processing technology reported to increase the efficiency of maple syrup production by increasing production of more economically valuable light-colored maple syrup, and reducing development of loose scale mineral precipitates in syrup, and scale deposits on evaporator pans. These effects have not been evaluated, and the effects of AI on syrup chemistry and flavor are unknown. The color, chemical composition, and flavor volatiles of syrup produced simultaneously with and without AI from a common source of maple sap were compared. The chemical composition of syrup produced with and without AI was within ranges previously published for maple syrup. Syrup produced with AI was significantly lighter in color than syrup produced simultaneously without AI using the same maple sap (p < 0.0039), but contained fewer volatile flavor compounds (p < 0.0015). The quantity of loose scale produced or thickness of scale deposited on evaporator pans did not differ significantly between the treatments (p < 0.1326, p < 0.9152). The results indicate that AI produced syrup with chemical composition consistent with pure maple syrup, and increased production efficiency by increasing the amount of light-colored syrup produced, but not by reducing loose scale development or scale deposition.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page