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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MICROBIAL INTERACTIONS AND INTERVENTIONS TO REDUCE TRANSMISSION OF FOODBORNE PATHOGENS THROUGH POULTRY Title: Associations between vaccinations against protozoal and viral infections and Salmonella in broiler flocks

Authors
item Volkova, Veronika -
item Wills, Robert -
item Hubbard, Sue -
item Magee, Danny -
item Byrd, James
item Bailey, Richard -

Submitted to: Epidemiology and Infection
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 17, 2010
Publication Date: April 29, 2010
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/57253
Citation: Volkova, V.V., Wills, R.W., Hubbard, S.A., Magee, D., Byrd II, J.A., Bailey, R. 2010. Associations between vaccinations against protozoal and viral infections and Salmonella in broiler flocks. Epidemiology and Infection. 139:206-215.

Interpretive Summary: Reducing the burden of Salmonella in broiler flocks presents a challenge for the public’s health. A number of other infections are controlled in chickens by vaccination. The purpose of this study was to test if vaccination programs delivered to chickens were associated with the number of Salmonella in the chicken house as the birds grew. None of the groups of chickens were vaccinated against Salmonella or received a good bacteria containing product, nor were the parents vaccinated against Salmonella. We observed associations between the type of vaccine, the time the vaccine was used, and the probability to detect Salmonella in chicken groups as the birds grew. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first field report of such associations.

Technical Abstract: Reducing the burden of Salmonella in broiler flocks presents a challenge for public health and for sustainability of the industry. A number of other infections are simultaneously controlled in grow-out broilers world-wide by vaccination. The purpose of this exploratory analysis was to test, in a field observational study conducted in the southeastern USA, if details of routine heterologous vaccination programs delivered to conventional grow-out broilers were associated with the burden of Salmonella in the flock as it progressed through its production cycle. None of the grow-out flocks studied were vaccinated against Salmonella or received a competitive exclusion product, nor were the parents immunized against Salmonella. We observed associations between the content and design of grow-out vaccination programs and the probability to detect Salmonella in broiler flock at different points throughout the production cycle. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first field report of such associations.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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