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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHEMICAL SIGNALS FOR MANAGING INSECTS Title: Field response of Colorado potato beetle to the (R)-enantiomer of the male-produced aggregation pheromone CPB I and determination of activity of blends of the (S)- and (R)-enantiomers of the pheromone

Authors
item Hitchner, Erin - DPT ENT, VA TECH, PTR,VA
item Kuhar, Thomas - DPT ENT, VA TECH, PTR,VA
item Youngman, Roger - DPT ENT, VA TECH, BLKB,VA
item Mori, Kenji - FUJI FLV CO,TOKYO,JAPAN
item Dickens, Joseph

Submitted to: Agricultural Sciences
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 28, 2012
Publication Date: October 28, 2012
Citation: Hitchner, E.M., Kuhar, T.P., Youngman, R.R., Mori, K., Dickens, J.C. 2012. Field response of Colorado potato beetle to the (R)-enantiomer of the male-produced aggregation pheromone CPB I and determination of activity of blends of the (S)- and (R)-enantiomers of the pheromone. Agricultural Sciences. 3:896-899.

Interpretive Summary: The Colorado potato beetle (CPB) is a key pest of potatoes and other solanaceous crops in North America, Europe and Asia. As CPB rapidly develops resistance to pesticides, more sustainable approaches and novel strategies are needed for its management. A chemical compound produced by male beetles attracts other beetles and might be used to control them. But this chemical compound exists in two forms and only one form is attractive to the beetles. The other form might be used to fool the beetles and disrupt mating. We now show that the other form of the chemical compound has no discernible effect on CPB behavior and development in the field, and thus provides no protection for potato crop. Blends of the two forms of the compound containing 87% or less of the attractive form were unattractive. Our results indicate the need for additional research in order to optimize trap design and increase the effectiveness of the attractive form of the chemical, perhaps with the addition of chemicals from the host plant. This information can be used by ecologists and entomologists to further investigate use and deployment of CPB attractants as components of alternative management strategies for CPB.

Technical Abstract: Adult Colorado potato beetles (CPB) are attracted to (S)-3,7-dimethyl-2-oxo-oct-6-ene-1,3-diol [(S)-CPB I], a male-produced aggregation pheromone. Studies were conducted to determine if the opposite enantiomer of the pheromone, (R)-CPB I had an effect on CPB in the field. Results revealed no differences in counts of all CPB life stages between untreated potato plots with and without rows inundated with (R)-CPB I lures. In addition, the relative attraction of CPB adults to various blends of the (S)- and (R)-enantiomers was investigated and showed that blends that were 87%(S) or less were not attractive to CPB adults.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
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