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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A systematic approach to the identification of common hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids in plant materials

Authors
item Lin, Longze
item Harnly, James

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 29, 2008
Publication Date: November 12, 2008
Citation: Lin, L., Harnly, J.M. 2008. A systematic approach to the identification of common hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids in plant materials. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 56:10105-10114.

Interpretive Summary: This paper presents the detailed identification of the hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids in arnica flowers, burdock roots, coffee beans and artichokes, and provides a general approach to the positive identification of these common and complex isomeric phenolic compounds in other foods. This identification method is based on the patterns of occurrence of hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids in plants, relative concentration, elution order, and the retention times recorded with 4 common LC columns. This information will provide an easy way for researchers to correctly and rapidly identify complex isomers in plants.

Technical Abstract: A standardized profiling method based on liquid chromatography with diode array and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometric detection (LC-DAD-ESI/MS) was used to separate and identify the phenolic components of arnica flowers (Arnica montana L.), burdock roots (Artium lappa L.), coffee beans (Coffea arabica L. and C. rubusta L.) and fennel seeds (Foeniculum vulgare Mill). We identified 28, 22, 26 and 10 hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids in arnica flower, burdock roots, coffee beans and fennel seeds, respectively. These compounds were used to develop a systematic method for the identification of common hydroxycinnamoylquinic acid isomers in food plants based on their retention times. Adequate separation and reliable identification were achieved using 2 different reverse phase columns. This is the first report of more than 33 hydroxycinnamates in these 4 food plants.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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