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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT OF NATURAL PRODUCT-BASED WEED MANAGEMENT METHODS

Location: Natural Products Utilization Research

Title: Biological Activity of Allelochemicals

Authors
item Dayan, Franck
item Duke, Stephen

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: May 3, 2009
Publication Date: July 6, 2009
Citation: Dayan, F.E., Duke, S.O. 2009. Biological Activity of Allelochemicals. Book Chapter. In: Plant-Derived Natural Products. A.E. Osbourn and V. Lanzotti (eds.). Springer Science, New York, New York, pp. 361-384.

Interpretive Summary: All plants produce compounds that are phytotoxic to another plant species at some concentration. In some cases, these compounds function, at least in part, in plant/plant interactions, where a phytotoxin donor plant adversely affects a target plant, resulting in an advantage for the donor plant. This review discusses how such an allelochemical role of a phytotoxin can be proven and provides examples of some of the more studied phytochemicals that have been implicated in allelopathy. These include artemisinin, cineoles, beta-Triketones, catechin, sorgoleone, juglone and related quinones, rice allelochemicals, benzoxazinoids, common phenolic acids, L-DOPA, and m-tyrosine. Mechanisms of avoiding autotoxicity in the donor species are also discussed.

Technical Abstract: All plants produce compounds that are phytotoxic to another plant species at some concentration. In some cases, these compounds function, at least in part, in plant/plant interactions, where a phytotoxin donor plant adversely affects a target plant, resulting in an advantage for the donor plant. This review discusses how such an allelochemical role of a phytotoxin can be proven and provides examples of some of the more studied phytochemicals that have been implicated in allelopathy. These include artemisinin, cineoles, beta-Triketones, catechin, sorgoleone, juglone and related quinones, rice allelochemicals, benzoxazinoids, common phenolic acids, L-DOPA, and m-tyrosine. Mechanisms of avoiding autotoxicity in the donor species are also discussed.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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