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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROL OF ARTHROPOD PESTS OF PECAN AND PEACH

Location: Fruit and Nut Research

Title: Emerging insect problems in peach: A new look at root-feeding weevils and the lesser peachtree borer

Authors
item Cottrell, Ted
item Horton, Dan - UNIV OF GA

Submitted to: Southeastern Peach Convention Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: December 8, 2007
Publication Date: January 11, 2008
Citation: Cottrell, T.E., Horton, D. 2008. Emerging insect problems in peach: A new look at root-feeding weevils and the lesser peachtree borer. In: Proceedings of the Southeastern Peach Convention, January 10-12, 2008, Savannah, Georgia. p. 18-22.

Interpretive Summary: Although the fruit-attacking plum curculio remains the primary pest of peach production across the Southeastern Unites States, other insect pests that attack the peach tree can inflict serious economic losses. Some of these other pests, such as scale insects and the peachtree borer, are common pests that are effectively controlled. Yet another common pest, the lesser peachtree borer, has become more abundant and is a challenge to control. It is likely that changes in insecticide usage have caused the lesser peachtree borer to become a serious pest of peach. It is also likely that other insects of historical insignificance to peach will become pests that must be considered and controlled. Included in this group of pests are those insects that attack the tree roots. Most likely controlled by broad spectrum organophosphate insecticides in the past and otherwise overlooked, root-feeding weevils such as the Fuller rose beetle and the twobanded Japanese weevil are capable of causing considerable damage to the roots as larvae feed. In this document we provide information on the Fuller rose beetle and the twobanded Japanese weevil as pests of peach and results of monitoring these pests season-long in commercial and research peach orchards. Additionally, we provide an update of our continuing research on the lesser peachtree borer. Our basic research with the lesser peachtree borer seeks to understand egg laying choices made by the females and how this information relates to orchard management practices like pruning.

Technical Abstract: Although the fruit-attacking plum curculio remains the primary pest of peach production across the Southeastern Unites States, other insect pests that attack the peach tree can inflict serious economic losses. Some of these other pests, such as scale insects and the peachtree borer, are common pests that are effectively controlled. Yet another common pest, the lesser peachtree borer, has become more abundant and is a challenge to control. It is likely that changes in insecticide usage have caused the lesser peachtree borer to become a serious pest of peach. It is also likely that other insects of historical insignificance to peach will become pests that must be considered and controlled. Included in this group of pests are those insects that attack the tree roots. Most likely controlled by broad spectrum organophosphate insecticides in the past and otherwise overlooked, root-feeding weevils such as the Fuller rose beetle and the twobanded Japanese weevil are capable of causing considerable damage to the roots as larvae feed. In this document we provide information on the Fuller rose beetle and the twobanded Japanese weevil as pests of peach and results of monitoring these pests season-long in commercial and research peach orchards. Additionally, we provide an update of our continuing research on the lesser peachtree borer. Our basic research with the lesser peachtree borer seeks to understand egg laying choices made by the females and how this information relates to orchard management practices like pruning.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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