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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Determination of Differential Gene Expression of the Uterovaginal Tract of Sham versus Artificially Inseminated Turkey (Melleagris Gallapovo) Hens Utilizing Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization

Authors
item Foye Jackson, Ondulla
item Long, Julie
item Bakst, Murray
item Blomberg, Le Ann
item McMurtry, John

Submitted to: BARC Poster Day
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 15, 2007
Publication Date: April 25, 2007
Citation: Foye Jackson, O.T., Long, J.A., Bakst, M.R., Blomberg, L., McMurtry, J.P. 2007. Determination of Differential Gene Expression of the Uterovaginal Tract of Sham versus Artificially Inseminated Turkey (Melleagris Gallapovo) Hens Utilizing Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization. BARC Poster Day.

Technical Abstract: Due to intensive selection for enhanced breast/meat yield, the modern male turkey tom can weigh up to eighty-five pounds, in contrast to the average twenty pounds of the laying hen. Consequently, this vast size difference hinders natural mating and has lead to routine artificial insemination (AI) within the turkey industry. In contrast to prolonged sperm storage and viability within the sperm storage tubules (SST) of the uterovaginal tract of the turkey hen, sperm viability is reduced to 8-18 hours in vitro under optimal handling procedures, with approximately 1% of inseminated sperm transported and stored within the SST (Brillard, 1993). Therefore, there is a need within the turkey industry to better understand the regulatory mechanisms involved in long-term sperm storage to improve sperm viability, storage and reproductive efficiency. We aim to elucidate the differential gene expression patterns present in artificially versus sham-inseminated (SI) hens in an effort to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in regulating prolonged sperm storage in the SST. We will determine differential gene expression patterns with suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH), in which cDNA libraries will be constructed from the vaginal epithelium and SST of AI versus SI photo-stimulated hens. Hybridization of differing cDNA populations will identify unique genes present as un-hybridized cDNAs. Differentially expressed genes will be subsequently cloned to obtain full length sequences and later validated by Northern Blot analysis. With greater insight of the regulatory mechanisms involved in prolonged sperm SST storage, turkey producers may improve reproduction and ultimately meat and egg production which may be of economic importance to the American consumer.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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