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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Microbial Census and Evidence for a Direct Temporal Effect of Bale Moisture with Color Grade During a 6 Month Storage

Authors
item Chun, David
item Mcalister, David - USTER TECHNOLOGIES
item Hughs, Sidney
item Cobb, Dean - ITT

Submitted to: Journal of Cotton Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 31, 2006
Publication Date: September 13, 2006
Citation: Chun, D.T., Mcalister, D.D., Hughs, S.E., Cobb, D.R. 2006. Microbial census and evidence for a direct temporal effect of bale moisture with color grade during a 6 month storage. Journal of Cotton Science. 10:201-209.

Interpretive Summary: Earlier studies indicated that storing cottons wet could lead to lower fiber quality associated with microbial activity. The purpose of this study was to follow the moisture content changes and microbial populations for 1, 2, and 6 months storage periods in cotton bales with high moisture contents. The initial target moisture contents studied were 6% (ambient), 8%, 10%, and 12%. After 2- and 6-months the moisture contents did not change significantly from the initial moisture contents at 1-month. The high moisture content bales lost moisture after 6-months storage while the three other moisture content bales tended to retain the same moisture content. The microbial populations did not change significantly during 1 and 2 months storage which were colder winter months. The greatest microbial changes associated with moisture content occurred after 6 months of storage, which took place during the warmer spring and summer months.

Technical Abstract: As part of an ongoing investigation, a corroborative study was done to follow fiber quality, moisture content and microbial population changes for 1-, 2-, and 6-mpnth storage periods in cotton bales with high moisture contents. The target moisture contents were 6% (control/ambient moisture content), 8%, 10% and 12%. After 2- and 6-months, the moisture content did not change significantly from the initial moisture content at 1-month storage. The high moisture content bales lost moisture after 6-months storage while the three other moisture content bales tended to retain the same moisture content. The microbial populations did not change significantly during 1 and 2 months storage, which were colder winter months. The greatest microbial changes associated with moisture content occurred after 6 months storage, which took place during the warmer spring and summer months. Observations on fiber quality associated with moisture content are addressed.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014
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