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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING SOIL AND NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR SUSTAINED PRODUCTIVITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Title: Rhizosphere Ecology

Authors
item Broeckling, Corey - CSU, FT. COLLINS, CO
item Vivanco, Jorge - CSU, FT. COLLINS, CO
item Paschke, Mark - CSU, FT. COLLINS, CO
item Manter, Daniel

Submitted to: Ecology
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: January 6, 2007
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The rhizosphere is defined as the region of soil surrounding plant roots that is under the influence of the root. This region is centered around the root, and is best defined by the biotic response to the influence of the root. Thus, the spatial limits of the rhizosphere are determined by the soil biotic community under the direct or indirect influence of plant roots. The composition and dynamics of this biotic community is dependent on plant species, root architecture, plant carbon allocation, soil physical and chemical properties, microbial population diversity, among a host of other factors. Though root biology and ecology are more challenging than aboveground studies, the biological and ecological importance of the root system and surrounding rhizosphere has prompted many detailed studies of root biology and rhizosphere ecology. This chapter will discuss the mechanisms that drive the establishment and dynamics of the rhizosphere, will introduce examples of a few ecological interactions which occur in the rhizosphere, and will describe methods for studying the rhizosphere community.

Technical Abstract: The rhizosphere is defined as the region of soil surrounding plant roots that is under the influence of the root. This region is centered around the root, and is best defined by the biotic response to the influence of the root. Thus, the spatial limits of the rhizosphere are determined by the soil biotic community under the direct or indirect influence of plant roots. The composition and dynamics of this biotic community is dependent on plant species, root architecture, plant carbon allocation, soil physical and chemical properties, microbial population diversity, among a host of other factors. Though root biology and ecology are more challenging than aboveground studies, the biological and ecological importance of the root system and surrounding rhizosphere has prompted many detailed studies of root biology and rhizosphere ecology. This chapter will discuss the mechanisms that drive the establishment and dynamics of the rhizosphere, will introduce examples of a few ecological interactions which occur in the rhizosphere, and will describe methods for studying the rhizosphere community.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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