Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Biomass Production and Nutrient Uptake of Rye Following Peanut Residue

Authors
item Balkcom, Kipling
item Wood, C - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Adams, J - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Meso, B - AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2006
Publication Date: July 1, 2006
Citation: Balkcom, K.S., Wood, C.W., Adams, J.F., Meso, B. 2006. Biomass production and nutrient uptake of rye following peanut residue. In: Schwartz, R.C., Baumhardt, R.L., Bell, J.M., editors. Proceedings of the 28th Southern Conservation Systems conference, June 26-28, 2006, Amarillo, Texas. USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory Report No. 06-1, Bushland, Texas.

Interpretive Summary: Residues from crops that produce their own N could supply enough N to maximize biomass production of a cover crop grown in conjunction with conservation tillage. This study, conducted by researchers from the National Soil Dynamics Laboratory and cooperators from the Agronomy and Soils Department at Auburn University assessed the N contribution of peanut residue to a rye cover crop grown as part of a conservation system on a Dothan sandy loam at Headland, AL during the 2003-2005 growing seasons. Treatments consisted of peanut residue retained or removed from the soil surface, and N fertilizer application rates (0, 30, 60 and 90 lb ac-1) applied in fall. Peanut residue had no affect any measured variables, which including rye biomass production, N content, C/N ratio, or N, P, K and Ca uptake. Additional N increased rye biomass, N, P, K, and Ca uptakes, although the highest N rate did not maximize these observed variables. Our results indicate that peanut residue does not contribute significant amounts of N to a rye cover crop grown as part of a conservation system, but retaining peanut residue on the soil surface can improve soil physical properties of the typically degraded southeastern soils.

Technical Abstract: Leguminous crops have been utilized in conservation systems to partially meet N requirements of succeeding summer cash crops. This study assessed the N contribution of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) residues to a subsequent rye (Secale cereale L.) cover crop grown in a conservation system on a Dothan sandy loam (fine-loamy, kaolinitic, thermic Plinthic Kandiudults) at Headland, AL during the 2003-2005 growing seasons. Treatments were arranged in a split plot design, with main plots of peanut residue retained or removed from the soil surface, and subplots as N application rates (0, 30, 60 and 90 lb ac-1) applied in fall. Peanut residue did not affect rye biomass yields, N content, C/N ratio, or N, P, K and Ca uptake. Additional N increased rye biomass, N, P, K, and Ca uptakes, although the highest N rate did not maximize these observed variables. Our results indicate that peanut residue does not contribute significant amounts of N to a rye cover crop grown as part of a conservation system, but retaining peanut residue on the soil surface can improve soil physical properties of the typically degraded southeastern soils.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page